Affiliations 

  • 1 a Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine , Mutah University , Mutah , Al-Karak , Jordan
  • 2 b Maternofetal and Embryo (MatE) Research Group, Faculty of Medicine , Universiti Teknologi MARA, Sungai Buloh Campus , Selangor , Malaysia
  • 3 d Faculty of Dentistry , Dijlah University College Baghdad , Baghdad , Iraq
  • 4 e Faculty of Pharmacy , Isra University , Amman , Jordan
  • 5 f Population Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine , Universiti Teknologi MARA, Sungai Buloh Campus , Selangor , Malaysia
J. Matern. Fetal. Neonatal. Med., 2019 Oct;32(20):3464-3469.
PMID: 29656685 DOI: 10.1080/14767058.2018.1465557

Abstract

Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a serious health problem. It is a major contributor to end-stage liver disease. Worldwide, 1-8% of all pregnant women were infected. Women with viral hepatitis may be at an increased risk of pregnancy complications. There are several obstetrics intervention acts as risk factors, which are specific to women pertaining the HCV infection; anti-D immunoglobulin (Ig) therapy may be one of them. Our objectives were to estimate the prevalence of HCV antibodies (anti-HCV), RNA, and genotype distribution among women with anti-D Ig therapy. Materials and methods: A cross sectional study was conducted. A sample of 154 Rhesus negative (Rh - ve) pregnant women regardless of the anti-D Ig therapy was collected. Anti-HCV were tested using third generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA-3) and immunoblot assay (Lia Tek-111), subsequently. In addition, 89 serum samples were subjected to molecular analysis using RT-PCR and DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA) method for the detection of HCV-RNA and genotypes. Results: Anti-HCV, and HCV-RNA seroprevalence were significantly higher (17.1, 35.5%) among women with anti-D Ig than their counter group (6.4, 13.16%), p = .038, .018, respectively. Significant direct positive dose response correlation (r = 0.78, p = .005) had been seen between number of anti-D Ig therapy and anti-HCV seropositive rate. Anti-D Ig therapy act as a risk factor (odds ratio (OR) = 3.01, 95%CI: 1.01-8.9) especially from the third dose onward. Women with anti-D Ig therapy were at higher risk (3.6 times more) of positive HCV-RNA (OR =3.6, 95%CI =1.19-10.837). Genotype HCV-1b showed higher prevalent (52.9%) among the recipients of anti-D Ig therapy while genotype HCV-3a (6.6%) was the lowest. Conclusions: Our study showed that Anti-D immunoglobulin therapy acts as a risk factor for acquiring HCV infection. Screening for HCV should be recommended for all recipients of anti-D Ig. Not only HCV antibodies but HCV-RNA detection being recommended for the diagnosis of HCV infection. A brief rational: Pregnant women with HCV infection are at risk of adverse obstetric outcome. Anti-D Ig therapy may be a risk factor for HCV infection. Hence, we conducted a cross sectional study with the objectives to estimate the prevalence of HCV antibodies (anti-HCV), RNA, and genotype distribution among women with anti-D Ig therapy. We found that anti-HCV and HCV-RNA seroprevalence were significantly higher in women with anti-D Ig. In addition, women with anti-D Ig therapy were 3.6 times more at risk of positive HCV-RNA with genotype HCV-1b showed higher prevalence. Therefore, anti-D Ig therapy is a risk factor for acquiring HCV infection and we recommend screening for HCV for all recipients of anti-D Ig. In addition, the diagnosis of HCV infection, should be made with HCV antibodies and HCV-RNA detection.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.