Affiliations 

  • 1 Diabetes & Endocrine Unit, Institute for Medical Research, National Institutes of Health, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Jalan Pahang, 50588, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. fazliana@imr.gov.my
  • 2 Diabetes & Endocrine Unit, Institute for Medical Research, National Institutes of Health, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Jalan Pahang, 50588, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  • 3 Institute for Public Health, National Institutes of Health, Ministry of Health Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  • 4 Public Health Development Division, Ministry of Health, Putrajaya, Malaysia
  • 5 Kuala Lumpur Health Clinic, Jalan Temerloh, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
BMC Womens Health, 2018 07 19;18(Suppl 1):93.
PMID: 30066641 DOI: 10.1186/s12905-018-0592-2

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Obesity is related to the increased incidence of hypertension and in healthy individuals, blood pressure changes with age and body mass. The aims of this paper were to evaluate the effectiveness of the weight loss intervention on body composition and blood pressure, and to evaluate the relationship between these factors among housewives in the MyBFF@home study.

METHODS: MyBFF@home intervention was a quasi-experimental study which involved 328 overweight and obese housewives aged 18-59 years old (Control group: 159, Intervention group: 169). Data of the control and intervention group (pre and post intervention who completed the body composition and blood pressure measurements were analysed. Body compositions were measured using the Body Impedance Analyser (InBody 720) and blood pressure (Systolic and Diastolic) was taken using the blood pressure monitoring device (Omron HEM 907) at baseline, 6 month and 12 month. Data analyses (Pearson's correlation test and ANOVA) were performed and analysed using SPSS Statistics for Windows, version 22.0.

RESULTS: Visceral fat area, fat mass and body fat percentage, were all significantly decreased in the intervention group compared to the control group after 6 month intervention (p 

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Similar publications