Affiliations 

  • 1 CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos s/n, Matosinhos, 4450-208, Portugal. elsafroufe@gmail.com
  • 2 IBIGER - Institute of Biogeography and Genetic Resources, Federal Center for Integrated Arctic Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Severnaya Dvina Emb. 23, Arkhangelsk, 163000, Russian Federation
  • 3 Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, The David Attenborough Building, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3QZ, UK
  • 4 North Carolina State Museum of Natural Sciences, 11 West Jones St., Raleigh, NC, 27601, USA
  • 5 Département de Sciences Biologiques, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, H2V 2S9, Canada
  • 6 Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong, 3220, VIC, Australia
  • 7 Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, 10900, Thailand
  • 8 Department of Agriculture, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bansomdejchaopraya Rajabhat University, Bangkok, 10600, Thailand
  • 9 CNR - Institute for Ecosystems Studies, Verbania Pallanza (VB), Italy
  • 10 CIIMAR/CIMAR - Interdisciplinary Centre of Marine and Environmental Research, University of Porto, Terminal de Cruzeiros do Porto de Leixões, Av. General Norton de Matos s/n, Matosinhos, 4450-208, Portugal
  • 11 CBMA - Centre of Molecular and Environmental Biology, Department of Biology, University of Minho, Campus Gualtar, Braga, 4710-057, Portugal
  • 12 CIMO/ESA/IPB - Mountain Research Centre, School of Agriculture, Polytechnic Institute of Bragança, Campus de Santa Apolónia, Apartado 1172, Bragança, 5301-854, Portugal
  • 13 CITAB/UTAD - Centre for Research and Technology of Agro-Environment and Biological Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Forestry Department, Vila Real, 5000-801, Portugal
  • 14 Biology Department, Institute for Great Lakes Research, Central Michigan University, Biosciences Bldg. 2408, Mount Pleasant, MI, 48859, USA
  • 15 School of Environmental and Geographical Sciences, University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Jalan Broga, Semenyih, 43500, Malaysia
Heredity (Edinb), 2020 01;124(1):182-196.
PMID: 31201385 DOI: 10.1038/s41437-019-0242-y

Abstract

Using a new fossil-calibrated mitogenome-based approach, we identified macroevolutionary shifts in mitochondrial gene order among the freshwater mussels (Unionoidea). We show that the early Mesozoic divergence of the two Unionoidea clades, Margaritiferidae and Unionidae, was accompanied by a synchronous split in the gene arrangement in the female mitogenome (i.e., gene orders MF1 and UF1). Our results suggest that this macroevolutionary jump was completed within a relatively short time interval (95% HPD 201-226 Ma) that coincided with the Triassic-Jurassic mass extinction. Both gene orders have persisted within these clades for ~200 Ma. The monophyly of the so-called "problematic" Gonideinae taxa was supported by all the inferred phylogenies in this study using, for the first time, the M- and F-type mitogenomes either singly or combined. Within Gonideinae, two additional splits in the gene order (UF1 to UF2, UF2 to UF3) occurred in the Mesozoic and have persisted for ~150 and ~100 Ma, respectively. Finally, the mitogenomic results suggest ancient connections between freshwater basins of East Asia and Europe near the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, probably via a continuous paleo-river system or along the Tethys coastal line, which are well supported by at least three independent but almost synchronous divergence events.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.