Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 44 in total

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  1. Mat Jais AM, Dambisya YM, Lee TL
    J Ethnopharmacol, 1997 Jul;57(2):125-30.
    PMID: 9254114
    Haruan, Channa striatus, is a snakehead fish consumed in many parts of the southeast Asian region. It is believed to promote wound healing, as well as reduce post-operative pain. In an attempt to establish the scientific basis for the alleged pain-relieving benefits of this fish, we studied the antinociceptive effects of whole fillet and mucus extracts from haruan in the mouse using the abdominal constriction and tail flick tests. In the abdominal constriction test, the 30 min fillet extract exhibited concentration-dependent inhibition of the writhing response in the 10-50% concentration range, with 20% as the IC50 value. This activity was not dependent on the duration of extraction, with no significant differences among the extracts obtained at durations of 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 min (range between 45-54% inhibition at 20% concentration). The mucus extract also showed concentration-dependent inhibition of the abdominal constriction response-at the highest concentration used the average inhibition was 68.9%, while IC50 value was 25%. Neither the fillet extract (30 min, 20%) nor the mucus extract (25%) had any demonstrable effect on the tail flick latency on their own, but significantly enhanced the antinociceptive activity of morphine in this assay. Similarly, low concentrations of the mucus and fillet extract enhanced the effects of morphine in the abdominal constriction test. Collectively, these results suggest a scientific basis for the folklore practice of eating haruan fish in the post-operative period for pain relief: Haruan extracts have antinociceptive activity and enhance the activity of other antinociceptive agents.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  2. Dua K, Sheshala R, Ling TY, Hui Ling S, Gorajana A
    PMID: 23286236
    At present, approximately 25%of drugs in modern pharmacopoeia are derived from plant sources (phytomedicines) that can be developed for the treatment of diseases and disorders. Many other drugs are synthetic analogues built on the prototype compounds isolated from plants. Cocos nucifera Linn. (Arecaceae), which is commonly known as coconut, is a plant possessing a lot of potential as an ingredient in traditional medicines for the treatment of metabolic disorders and particularly as an anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and analgesic agent. This review emphasizes on the recent literature and research findings that highlight the significant biological activities of C. nucifera Linn. such as its anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and analgesic properties. This review can help researchers keen on exploiting the therapeutic potential of C. nucifera Linn. which may motivate them to further explore their commercial viability.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  3. Khalid S, Shaik Mossadeq WM, Israf DA, Hashim P, Rejab S, Shaberi AM, et al.
    Med Princ Pract, 2010;19(4):255-9.
    PMID: 20516700 DOI: 10.1159/000312710
    To study the effects of Tamarindus indica L. aqueous fruit extract on the antinociceptive activities in rodent models.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  4. Zakaria ZA, Patahuddin H, Mohamad AS, Israf DA, Sulaiman MR
    J Ethnopharmacol, 2010 Mar 2;128(1):42-8.
    PMID: 20035852 DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2009.12.021
    Piper sarmentosum (Piperaceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used by the Malays to treat headaches, toothaches, coughs, asthma and fever.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  5. Sani MH, Taher M, Susanti D, Kek TL, Salleh MZ, Zakaria ZA
    Biol Res Nurs, 2015 Jan;17(1):68-77.
    PMID: 25504952 DOI: 10.1177/1099800414529648
    Elucidate the antinociceptive mechanisms of α-mangostin isolated from Garcinia malaccensis Linn.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  6. Kaka U, Hui Cheng C, Meng GY, Fakurazi S, Kaka A, Behan AA, et al.
    Biomed Res Int, 2015;2015:305367.
    PMID: 25695060 DOI: 10.1155/2015/305367
    Effects of ketamine and lidocaine on electroencephalographic (EEG) changes were evaluated in minimally anaesthetized dogs, subjected to electric stimulus. Six dogs were subjected to six treatments in a crossover design with a washout period of one week. Dogs were subjected to intravenous boluses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg, ketamine 3 mg/kg, meloxicam 0.2 mg/kg, morphine 0.2 mg/kg and loading doses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by continuous rate infusion (CRI) of 50 and 100 mcg/kg/min, and ketamine 3 mg/kg followed by CRI of 10 and 50 mcg/kg/min. Electroencephalogram was recorded during electrical stimulation prior to any drug treatment (before treatment) and during electrical stimulation following treatment with the drugs (after treatment) under anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with halothane at a stable concentration between 0.85 and 0.95%. Pretreatment median frequency was evidently increased (P < 0.05) for all treatment groups. Lidocaine, ketamine, and morphine depressed the median frequency resulting from the posttreatment stimulation. The depression of median frequency suggested evident antinociceptive effects of these treatments in dogs. It is therefore concluded that lidocaine and ketamine can be used in the analgesic protocol for the postoperative pain management in dogs.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  7. Zakaria ZA, Mohamad AS, Chear CT, Wong YY, Israf DA, Sulaiman MR
    Med Princ Pract, 2010;19(4):287-94.
    PMID: 20516705 DOI: 10.1159/000312715
    The present study was carried out to determine the antiinflammatory and antinociceptive activities of a methanol extract of Zingiber zerumbet rhizomes (MEZZ) using various experimental model systems.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  8. Ong HM, Mohamad AS, Makhtar N', Khalid MH, Khalid S, Perimal EK, et al.
    J Ethnopharmacol, 2011 Jan 7;133(1):227-33.
    PMID: 20920570 DOI: 10.1016/j.jep.2010.09.030
    Acmella uliginosa (Sw.) Cass. is a medicinal herbaceous plant that is commonly used by the Malay community in Malaysia to relieve pain often associated with mouth ulcers, toothache, sore throat, and stomach ache.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  9. Sulaiman MR, Zakaria ZA, Chiong HS, Lai SK, Israf DA, Azam Shah TM
    Med Princ Pract, 2009;18(4):272-9.
    PMID: 19494533 DOI: 10.1159/000215723
    The present study was carried out to explore the antinociceptive as well as the anti-inflammatory effects of an ethanol extract of Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (L.) Vahl (EESJ) using 3 models of nociception and 2 models of inflammation in experimental animals.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  10. Sulaiman MR, Zakaria ZA, Abdul Rahman A, Mohamad AS, Desa MN, Stanslas J, et al.
    Biol Res Nurs, 2010 Jan;11(3):293-301.
    PMID: 19689990 DOI: 10.1177/1099800409343311
    The current study was performed to evaluate the antinociceptive and antiedematogenic properties of andrographolide isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata using two animal models. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated using the acetic acid- induced writhing and the hot-plate tests, while antiedematogenic activity was measured using the carrageenan-induced paw edema test. Subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of andrographolide (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) did not affect the motor coordination of the experimental animals but produced significant (p < .05) antinociceptive activity when assessed using both tests. However, 2 mg/kg naloxone failed to affect the 25 mg/kg andrographolide activity in both tests, indicating that the activity was modulated via nonopioid mechanisms. Furthermore, andrographolide showed significant (p < .05) antiedematogenic activity. In conclusion, the results obtained suggest that andrographolide has antinociceptive and antiedematogenic activities; it may be useful for treating pain and inflammation once human studies are conducted.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology
  11. Anbu JS, Jayaraj P, Varatharajan R, Thomas J, Jisha J, Muthappan M
    Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med, 2009 Jul 03;6(4):529-33.
    PMID: 20606773
    The ethanol and water extracts of Sansevieria trifasciata leaves showed dose-dependent and significant (P < 0.05) increase in pain threshold in tail-immersion test. Moreover, both the extracts (100 - 200 mg/kg) exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of writhing and also showed a significant (P < 0.001) inhibition of both phases of the formalin pain test. The ethanol extract (200 mg/kg) significantly (P < 0.01) reversed yeast-induced fever. Preliminary phytochemical screening of the extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, glycosides, terpenoids, tannins, proteins and carbohydrates.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  12. Kamilla L, Ramanathan S, Sasidharan S, Mansor SM
    Indian J Pharmacol, 2014 Sep-Oct;46(5):515-20.
    PMID: 25298581 DOI: 10.4103/0253-7613.140583
    Clitoria ternatea Linn. (C. ternatea) is an Ayurvedic herb traditionally used as medicine to relieve inflammatory, rheumatism, ear diseases, fever, arthritis, eye ailments, sore throat and body ache. This study aims to evaluate and elucidate the possible mechanism underlying the antinociceptive action of methanolic extracts of C. ternatea leaf and root using several antinociception models.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  13. Zakaria ZA, Mustapha S, Sulaiman MR, Mat Jais AM, Somchit MN, Abdullah FC
    Med Princ Pract, 2007;16(2):130-6.
    PMID: 17303949
    The present study was carried out to investigate the antinociceptive activity of the aqueous extract of Muntingia calabura (MCAE) leaves and to determine the effect of temperature and the involvement of the opioid receptor on the said activity using the abdominal constriction test (ACT) and hot-plate test (HPT) in mice.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  14. Zakaria ZA, Mat Jais AM, Goh YM, Sulaiman MR, Somchit MN
    Clin. Exp. Pharmacol. Physiol., 2007 Mar;34(3):198-204.
    PMID: 17250639
    1. The present study was performed in order to determine the amino acid and fatty acid composition of an aqueous extract of the freshwater fish Channa striatus, obtained by soaking (1:2, w/v) fresh fillets overnight in a chloroform:methanol (2:1, v/v) solvent, to elucidate the mechanism responsible for its antinociceptive activity and to clarify the relationship between the presence of the amino and fatty acids and the expected activity. 2. The aqueous extract was found to contain all amino acids with the major amino acids glycine, alanine, lysine, aspartic acid and proline making up 35.77 +/- 0.58, 10.19 +/- 1.27, 9.44 +/- 0.56, 8.53 +/- 1.15 and 6.86 +/- 0.78% of the total protein, respectively. 3. In addition, the aqueous extract was found to have a high palmitic acid (C16:0) content, which contributed approximately 35.93 +/- 0.63% to total fatty acids. The other major fatty acids in the aqueous extract were oleic acid (C18:1), stearic acid (C18:0), linoleic acid (C18:2) and arachidonic acid (C20:4), contributing 22.96 +/- 0.40, 15.31 +/- 0.33, 11.45 +/- 0.31 and 7.44 +/- 0.83% of total fatty acids, respectively. 4. Furthermore, the aqueous extract was demonstrated to possess concentration-dependent antinociceptive activity, as expected, when assessed using the abdominal constriction test in mice. 5. It is concluded that the aqueous extract of C. striatus contains all the important amino acids, but only some of the important fatty acids, which are suggested to play a key role in the observed antinociceptive activity of the extract, as well as in the traditionally claimed wound healing properties of the extract.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  15. Chongmelaxme B, Sruamsiri R, Dilokthornsakul P, Dhippayom T, Kongkaew C, Saokaew S, et al.
    Complement Ther Med, 2017 Dec;35:70-77.
    PMID: 29154071 DOI: 10.1016/j.ctim.2017.09.009
    Zingiber cassumunar Roxb. known locally as "Plai" in Thai, has been used for treating bruise, sprain and musculoskeletal pain. Several pre-clinical studies demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effect of Plai. However, current evidence of clinical effects of Plai is still unclear. This study aimed to determine the clinical efficacy and safety of Plai among all identified indications. Of the 808 articles identified by a systematic review, six studies were included. Four studies were randomized controlled trials, while two studies were quasi-experimental studies involving 178 patients in intervention group and 177 patients in control group. Duration of treatment ranged from 7days to 2 months. Our findings showed that 14% Plai cream had a strong trend of benefits in pain reduction for muscle pain and ankle sprain. However, evidence supporting the effects of Plai on acne vulgaris treatment and anti-histamine effect are still unclear.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology
  16. Ali Khan MS, Ahmed N, Misbah, Arifuddin M, Zakaria ZA, Al-Sanea MM, et al.
    Food Chem. Toxicol., 2018 May;115:523-531.
    PMID: 29555329 DOI: 10.1016/j.fct.2018.03.021
    In view of the report on anti-nociceptive activity of Leathery Murdah, Terminalia coriacea {Roxb.} Wight & Arn. (Combretaceae) leaves, the present study was conducted to isolate the active constituents and identify the underlying mechanisms. The methanolic extract of T. coriacea leaves (TCLME) at doses 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg orally, was subjected to various in-vivo assays in acetic acid induced writhing and formalin induced paw-licking tests with aspirin (100 mg/kg) and morphine (5 mg/kg) as reference drugs. Three flavonoids, rutin, robinin and gossypetin 3-glucuronide 8-glucoside were isolated and characterized from TCLME for the first time. The extract showed significant (p 
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  17. Kamarudin N, Hisamuddin N, Ong HM, Ahmad Azmi AF, Leong SW, Abas F, et al.
    Molecules, 2018 Aug 21;23(9).
    PMID: 30134576 DOI: 10.3390/molecules23092099
    Curcuminoids derived from turmeric rhizome have been reported to exhibit antinociceptive, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We evaluated the peripheral and central antinociceptive activities of 5-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)penta-2,4-dien-1-one (DHHPD), a novel synthetic curcuminoid analogue at 0.1, 0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg (intraperitoneal), through chemical and thermal models of nociception. The effects of DHHPD on the vanilloid and glutamatergic systems were evaluated through the capsaicin- and glutamate-induced paw licking tests. Results showed that DHHPD significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated the writhing response produced by the 0.8% acetic acid injection. In addition, 1 and 3 mg/kg of DHHPD significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the licking time spent by each mouse in both phases of the 2.5% formalin test and increased the response latency of mice on the hot-plate. However, the effect produced in the latter was not reversed by naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist. Despite this, DHHPD decreased the licking latency of mice in the capsaicin- and glutamate-induced paw licking tests in a dose response manner. In conclusion, DHHPD showed excellent peripheral and central antinociceptive activities possibly by attenuation of the synthesis and/or release of pro-inflammatory mediators in addition to modulation of the vanilloid and glutamatergic systems without an apparent effect on the opioidergic system.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  18. Zakaria ZA, Abdul Rahim MH, Mohd Sani MH, Omar MH, Ching SM, Abdul Kadir A, et al.
    BMC Complement Altern Med, 2019 Apr 02;19(1):79.
    PMID: 30940120 DOI: 10.1186/s12906-019-2486-8
    BACKGROUND: Methanol extract (MECN) of Clinacanthus nutans Lindau leaves (family Acanthaceae) demonstrated peripherally and centrally mediated antinociceptive activity via the modulation of opioid/NO-mediated, but cGMP-independent pathway. In the present study, MECN was sequentially partitioned to obtain petroleum ether extract of C. nutans (PECN), which was subjected to antinociceptive study with aims of establishing its antinociceptive potential and determining the role of opioid receptors and L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (L-arg/NO/cGMP) pathway in the observed antinociceptive activity.

    METHODS: The antinociceptive potential of orally administered PECN (100, 250, 500 mg/kg) was studied using the abdominal constriction-, hot plate- and formalin-induced paw licking-test in mice (n = 6). The effect of PECN on locomotor activity was also evaluated using the rota rod assay. The role of opioid receptors was determined by pre-challenging 500 mg/kg PECN (p.o.) with antagonist of opioid receptor subtypes, namely β-funaltrexamine (β-FNA; 10 mg/kg; a μ-opioid antagonist), naltrindole (NALT; 1 mg/kg; a δ-opioid antagonist) or nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI; 1 mg/kg; a κ-opioid antagonist) followed by subjection to the abdominal constriction test. In addition, the role of L-arg/NO/cGMP pathway was determined by prechallenging 500 mg/kg PECN (p.o.) with L-arg (20 mg/kg; a NO precursor), 1H-[1, 2, 4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 2 mg/kg; a specific soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor), or the combinations thereof (L-arg + ODQ) for 5 mins before subjection to the abdominal constriction test. PECN was also subjected to phytoconstituents analyses.

    RESULTS: PECN significantly (p  0.05) affect the locomotor activity of treated mice. The antinociceptive activity of PECN was significantly (p  0.05) affected by ODQ. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of at least cinnamic acid in PECN.

    CONCLUSION: PECN exerted antinocicpetive activity at peripheral and central levels possibly via the activation of non-selective opioid receptors and modulation of the NO-mediated/cGMP-independent pathway partly via the synergistic action of phenolic compounds.

    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  19. Zakaria ZA, Sani MH, Mohammat MF, Mansor NS, Shaameri Z, Kek TL, et al.
    Can. J. Physiol. Pharmacol., 2013 Dec;91(12):1143-53.
    PMID: 24289087 DOI: 10.1139/cjpp-2013-0099
    This study was carried out to determine the antinociceptive activity of a novel synthetic oxopyrrolidine-based compound, (2R,3R,4S)-ethyl 4-hydroxy-1,2-dimethyl-5-oxopyrrolidine-3-carboxylate (ASH21374), and to elucidate the involvement of the opioid, vanilloid, glutamate, and nitric oxide - cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO/cGMP) systems in modulating the observed antinociception. ASH21374, in the doses of 2, 10, and 100 mg/kg body mass, was administered orally to mice 60 mins prior to exposure to various antinociceptive assays. From the results obtained, ASH21374 exhibited significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive activity in the abdominal constriction, hot-plate, and formalin tests that was comparable with 100 mg/kg acetylsalicylic acid or 5 mg/kg morphine, respectively. ASH21374 also attenuated capsaicin- and glutamate-induced paw licking. Pre-treatment with 5 mg/kg naloxone significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited the activity in all assays, while pretreatment with 10 mg/kg β-funaltraxamine, 1 mg/kg naltrindole, or 1 mg/kg nor-binaltorphimine significantly (P < 0.05) reversed the activity in the abdominal constriction test. l-Arginine, N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl esters (l-NAME), methylene blue, and their combinations, failed to inhibit the ASH21374 antinociceptive activity. In conclusion, ASH21374 demonstrated antinociceptive activities on the peripheral and central nervous systems, mediated through the activation of opioid receptors, inhibition of the glutamatergic system, and attenuation of vanilloid-mediated nociceptive transmission. Further studies have been planned to determine the pharmacological potential of ASH21374.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology*
  20. Hassan Z, Muzaimi M, Navaratnam V, Yusoff NH, Suhaimi FW, Vadivelu R, et al.
    Neurosci Biobehav Rev, 2013 Feb;37(2):138-51.
    PMID: 23206666 DOI: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2012.11.012
    Kratom (or Ketum) is a psychoactive plant preparation used in Southeast Asia. It is derived from the plant Mitragyna speciosa Korth. Kratom as well as its main alkaloid, mitragynine, currently spreads around the world. Thus, addiction potential and adverse health consequences are becoming an important issue for health authorities. Here we reviewed the available evidence and identified future research needs. It was found that mitragynine and M. speciosa preparations are systematically consumed with rather well defined instrumentalization goals, e.g. to enhance tolerance for hard work or as a substitute in the self-treatment of opiate addiction. There is also evidence from experimental animal models supporting analgesic, muscle relaxant, anti-inflammatory as well as strong anorectic effects. In humans, regular consumption may escalate, lead to tolerance and may yield aversive withdrawal effects. Mitragynine and its derivatives actions in the central nervous system involve μ-opioid receptors, neuronal Ca²⁺ channels and descending monoaminergic projections. Altogether, available data currently suggest both, a therapeutic as well as an abuse potential.
    Matched MeSH terms: Analgesics/pharmacology
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