Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 543 in total

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  1. Noh A, Rafii MY, Saleh G, Kushairi A, Latif MA
    ScientificWorldJournal, 2012;2012:792601.
    PMID: 22701095 DOI: 10.1100/2012/792601
    The performance of 11 oil palm AVROS (Algemene Vereniging van Rubberplanters ter Oostkust van Sumatra) pisiferas was evaluated based on their 40 dura x pisifera (DxP) progenies tested on inland soils, predominantly of Serdang Series. Fresh fruit bunch (FFB) yield of each pisiferas ranged from 121.93 to 143.9 kg palm⁻¹ yr⁻¹ with trial mean of 131.62 kg palm⁻¹ yr⁻¹. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed low genetic variability among pisifera parents for most of the characters indicating uniformity of the pisifera population. This was anticipated as the AVROS pisiferas were derived from small population and were inbred materials. However, some of the pisiferas have shown good general combining ability (GCA) for certain important economic traits. Three pisiferas (P1 (0.174/247), P3 (0.174/498), P11 (0.182/308)) were identified of having good GCA for FFB yield while pisiferas P1 (0.174/247), P10 (0.182/348), and P11 (0.182/308) were good combiners for oil-to-bunch ratio (O/B). The narrow genetic base of these materials was the main obstacle in breeding and population improvement. However, efforts have been made to introgress this material with the vast oil palm germplasm collections of MPOB for rectifying the problem.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation/genetics*
  2. Sohrabi M, Rafii MY, Hanafi MM, Siti Nor Akmar A, Latif MA
    ScientificWorldJournal, 2012;2012:416291.
    PMID: 22654604 DOI: 10.1100/2012/416291
    Genetic diversity is prerequisite for any crop improvement program as it helps in the development of superior recombinants. Fifty Malaysian upland rice accessions were evaluated for 12 growth traits, yield and yield components. All of the traits were significant and highly significant among the accessions. The higher magnitudes of genotypic and phenotypic coefficients of variation were recorded for flag leaf length-to-width ratio, spikelet fertility, and days to flowering. High heritability along with high genetic advance was registered for yield of plant, days to flowering, and flag leaf length-to-width ratio suggesting preponderance of additive gene action in the gene expression of these characters. Plant height showed highly significant positive correlation with most of the traits. According to UPGMA cluster analysis all accessions were clustered into six groups. Twelve morphological traits provided around 77% of total variation among the accessions.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation/genetics*
  3. Rogatcheva MB, Borodin PM, Oda SI, Searle JB
    Genome, 1997 Feb;40(1):18-24.
    PMID: 9061910
    A high-resolution G-banding technique was used to identify five metacentrics that characterize Suncus murinus from Sri Lanka. These metacentrics were shown to be the product of Robertsonian fusion of acrocentric chromosomes identical to those in the standard karyotype defined by M.B. Rogatcheva et al. Two of the metacentrics in the Sri Lankan shrews (Rb(10.12) and Rb(14.15)) were the same as those reported by C.H. Sam et al. in Malayan populations of S. murinus. This finding provides strong support for the suggestion of T.H. Yosida that metacentric-carrying shrews colonized Malaya from Sri Lanka and hybridized with individuals of standard karyotype, generating the Robertsonian polymorphism now observed. In addition to the Robertsonian variation in S. murinus, we have used our high resolution technique (G- and C-banding) to characterize variants on chromosome 7, the X chromosome, and the Y chromosome.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  4. Nijman V
    Zoo Biol., 2016 Jan-Feb;35(1):1-3.
    PMID: 26661798 DOI: 10.1002/zoo.21256
    Ogata and Seino [Zoo Biol, 2015, 34:76-79] sequenced the mitochondrial D-loop of five proboscis monkeys Nasalis larvatus from Yokahama Zoo, Japan, that were imported from Surabaya Zoo, Indonesia. They compared their sequences with those of 16 proboscis monkeys from Sabah, Malaysia, and on the basis of a haplotype network analysis of 256 base pairs concluded that the northern Malaysian and southern Indonesian populations of proboscis monkeys are genetically differentiated. I provide information on the origin of the Indonesian proboscis monkeys, showing that they were the first-generation offspring of wild-caught individuals from the Pulau Kaget Strict Nature Reserve in the province of South Kalimantan. Using a phylogenetic approach and adding additional sequences from Indonesia and Malaysia, I reanalyzed their data, and found no support for a north-south divide. Instead the resulting tree based on 433 base pairs sequences show two strongly supported clades, both containing individuals from Indonesia and Malaysia. Work on captive individuals, as reported by Ogata and Seino, can aid in developing appropriate markers and techniques, but to obtain a more complete understanding of the genetic diversity and differentiation of wild proboscis monkeys, more detailed geographic sampling from all over Borneo is needed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  5. Nikzad S, Tan SG, Yong Seok Yien C, Ng J, Alitheen NB, Khan R, et al.
    J. Med. Primatol., 2014 Dec;43(6):433-44.
    PMID: 24930735 DOI: 10.1111/jmp.12130
    The genetic diversity and structure of long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Peninsular Malaysia, a widely used non-human primate species in biomedical research, have not been thoroughly characterized.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  6. Mostafa N, Omar H, Tan SG, Napis S
    Molecules, 2011 Mar 22;16(3):2599-608.
    PMID: 21441863 DOI: 10.3390/molecules16032599
    Haematococcus pluvialis (Flotow) is a unicellular green alga, which is considered to be the best astaxanthin-producing organism. Molecular markers are suitable tools for the purpose of finding out genetic variations in organisms; however there have been no studies conducted on ISSR or RAPD molecular markers for this organism. The DNA of 10 different strains of H. pluvialis (four strains from Iran, two strains from Finland, one strain from Switzerland and three strains from the USA) was extracted. A genetic similarity study was carried out using 14 ISSR and 12 RAPD primers. Moreover, the molecular weights of the bands produced ranged from 0.14 to 3.4 Kb. The PCA and dendrogram clustered the H. pluvialis strains into various groups according to their geographical origin. The lowest genetic similarity was between the Iran2 and USA2 strains (0.08) and the highest genetic similarity was between Finland1 and Finland2 (0.64). The maximum numbers of bands produced by the ISSR and RAPD primers were 35 and 6 bands, respectively. The results showed that ISSR and RAPD markers are useful for genetic diversity studies of Haematococcus as they showed geographical discrimination.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  7. Fix AG
    Ann. Hum. Genet., 1978 Jan;41(3):329-39.
    PMID: 626477
    Most current models of human population structure view migration solely as a deterministic force reducing the variance in gene frequencies among the local colonies of a subdivided population. By an empirical example and through simulation experiments, it is shown that migration structured along kinship lines (by analogy to the lineal or 'kinship' effect) does not always reduce the variances of gene frequencies arising through intergenerational random genetic drift. Thus populations experiencing high rates of migration may not be genetically homogenous.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  8. Ithnin M, Teh CK, Ratnam W
    BMC Genet., 2017 04 19;18(1):37.
    PMID: 28420332 DOI: 10.1186/s12863-017-0505-7
    BACKGROUND: The Elaeis oleifera genetic materials were assembled from its center of diversity in South and Central America. These materials are currently being preserved in Malaysia as ex situ living collections. Maintaining such collections is expensive and requires sizable land. Information on the genetic diversity of these collections can help achieve efficient conservation via maintenance of core collection. For this purpose, we have applied fourteen unlinked microsatellite markers to evaluate 532 E. oleifera palms representing 19 populations distributed across Honduras, Costa Rica, Panama and Colombia.

    RESULTS: In general, the genetic diversity decreased from Costa Rica towards the north (Honduras) and south-east (Colombia). Principle coordinate analysis (PCoA) showed a single cluster indicating low divergence among palms. The phylogenetic tree and STRUCTURE analysis revealed clusters based on country of origin, indicating considerable gene flow among populations within countries. Based on the values of the genetic diversity parameters, some genetically diverse populations could be identified. Further, a total of 34 individual palms that collectively captured maximum allelic diversity with reduced redundancy were also identified. High pairwise genetic differentiation (Fst > 0.250) among populations was evident, particularly between the Colombian populations and those from Honduras, Panama and Costa Rica. Crossing selected palms from highly differentiated populations could generate off-springs that retain more genetic diversity.

    CONCLUSION: The results attained are useful for selecting palms and populations for core collection. The selected materials can also be included into crossing scheme to generate offsprings that capture greater genetic diversity for selection gain in the future.

    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  9. Freeman MA, Kristmundsson Á
    Parasit Vectors, 2018 Oct 22;11(1):551.
    PMID: 30348210 DOI: 10.1186/s13071-018-3087-y
    BACKGROUND: The myxosporean Myxidium giardi Cépède, 1906 was described infecting the kidney of the European eel, Anguilla anguilla (L.), having spindle-shaped myxospores and terminal sub-spherical polar capsules. Since then, numerous anguillid eels globally have been documented to have similar Myxidium infections. Many of these have been identified using the morphological features of myxospores or by the location of infection in the host, and some have been subsequently synonymised with M. giardi. Therefore, it is not clear whether M. giardi is a widely distributed parasite, infecting numerous species of eels, in multiple organs, or whether some infections represent other, morphologically similar but different species of myxosporeans. The aim of the present study was to assess the status of M. giardi infections in Icelandic eels, and related fish hosts in Malaysia and to use spore morphology and molecular techniques to evaluate the diversity of myxosporeans present.

    RESULTS: The morphologies of the myxospores from Icelandic eels were very similar but the overall dimensions were significantly different from the various tissue locations. Myxospores from the kidney of the Malaysian tarpon, Megalops cyprinoides (Broussonet), were noticeably smaller. However, the SSU rDNA sequences from the different tissues locations in eels, were all very distinct, with percentage similarities ranging from 92.93% to as low as 89.8%, with the sequence from Malaysia being even more dissimilar. Molecular phylogenies consistently placed these sequences together in a clade that we refer to as the Paramyxidium clade that is strongly associated with the Myxidium clade (sensu stricto). We erect the genus Paramyxidium n. g. (Myxidiidae) to accommodate these histozoic taxa, and transfer Myxidium giardi as Paramyxidium giardi Cépède, 1906 n. comb. as the type-species.

    CONCLUSIONS: There is not a single species of Myxidium (M. giardi) causing systemic infections in eels in Iceland. There are three species, confirmed with a robust phylogeny, one of which represents Paramyxidium giardi n. comb. Additional species probably exist that infect different tissues in the eel and the site of infection in the host fish is an important diagnostic feature for this group (Paramyxidium n. g. clade). Myxospore morphology is generally conserved in the Paramyxidium clade, although actual spore dimensions can vary between some species. Paramyxidium spp. are currently only known to infect fishes from the Elopomorpha.

    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  10. Ernieenor FCL, Ernna G, Mariana A
    Exp. Appl. Acarol., 2017 Apr;71(4):387-400.
    PMID: 28409404 DOI: 10.1007/s10493-017-0120-3
    Morphotaxonomy based on phenotypic traits of immature hard ticks (Acari: Ixodidae) is a skill challenge and has prompted many inexperienced acarologists to adopt DNA-based methods for identifying and discriminating the species. The aim of this study is therefore to utilize COI gene for verifying the morphological status of Haemaphysalis ticks in Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 19 on-host ticks collected from four localities were first identified using specific illustrated taxonomic keys that lead to the genus of Haemaphysalis. Genotypic traits of tick species were then verified molecularly based on cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene using polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. Clustering analysis was carried out by constructing a phylogenetic tree to determine the genetic variation and diversity of local Haemaphysalis ticks. Based on external morphological characterizations, all immature ticks were successfully identified down to the genus level only. Molecular analysis of the genotypic using COI gene revealed 16 individuals (84%) as Haemaphysalis hystricis, and three individuals as H. humerosa with sequence homology of 97-99 and 86-87%, respectively. Haemaphysalis hystricis were clustered in their respective monophyletic group in the phylogeny trees with a bootstrap of 100%. Furthermore, a low intraspecific variation (<0.3%) was observed among Malaysian H. hystricis but high interspecific value (>15%) recorded. This study morphologically and molecularly confirms the presence of H. hystricis in Malaysia and the findings will add value to the existing knowledge in identification of ticks in this country.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation
  11. Esa Y, Abdul Rahim KA
    Biomed Res Int, 2013;2013:170980.
    PMID: 24455674 DOI: 10.1155/2013/170980
    This study examines the population genetic structure of Tor tambroides, an important freshwater fish species in Malaysia, using fifteen polymorphic microsatellite loci and sequencing of 464 base pairs of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene. A total of 152 mahseer samples were collected from eight populations throughout the Malaysia river system. Microsatellites results found high levels of intrapopulation variations, but mitochondrial COI results found high levels of interpopulations differentiation. The possible reasons for their discrepancies might be the varying influence of genetic drift on each marker or the small sample sizes used in most of the populations. The Kelantan population showed very low levels of genetic variations using both mitochondrial and microsatellite analyses. Phylogenetic analysis of the COI gene found a unique haplotype (ER8∗), possibly representing a cryptic lineage of T. douronensis, from the Endau-Rompin population. Nevertheless, the inclusion of nuclear microsatellite analyses could not fully resolve the genetic identity of haplotype ER8∗ in the present study. Overall, the findings showed a serious need for more comprehensive and larger scale samplings, especially in remote river systems, in combination with molecular analyses using multiple markers, in order to discover more cryptic lineages or undescribed "genetic species" of mahseer.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  12. Abu-Bakar SB, Razali NM, Naggs F, Wade C, Mohd-Nor SA, Aileen-Tan SH
    Mol. Biol. Rep., 2014 Mar;41(3):1799-805.
    PMID: 24443224 DOI: 10.1007/s11033-014-3029-5
    A total of 30 specimens belonging to five species, namely; Cryptozona siamensis, Sarika resplendens and Sarika sp. from the family Ariophantidae as well as Quantula striata and Quantula sp. from the family Dyakiidae were collected from the Langkawi Island in Northern Peninsular Malaysia. All specimens were identified through comparisons of shell morphology and amplification of a 500 bp segment of the 16S rRNA mtDNA gene. To assess phylogenetic insights, the sequences were aligned using ClustalW and phylogenetic trees were constructed. The analyses showed two major lineages in both Maximum Parsimony and Neighbour Joining phylogenetic trees. Each putative taxonomic group formed a monophyletic cluster. Our study revealed low species and intraspecies genetic diversities based on the 16S rRNA gene sequences. Thus, this study has provided an insight of land snail diversity in populations of an island highly influenced by anthropogenic activities through complementary use of shell morphological and molecular data.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  13. Yaacob JS, Loh HS, Mat Taha R
    ScientificWorldJournal, 2013;2013:613635.
    PMID: 23844406 DOI: 10.1155/2013/613635
    Mantled fruits as a result of somaclonal variation are often observed from the oil palm plantlets regenerated via tissue culture. The mantling of fruits with finger-like and thick outer coating phenotypes significantly reduces the seed size and oil content, posing a threat to oil palm planters, and may jeopardize the economic growth of countries that depend particularly on oil palm plantation. The molecular aspects of the occurrence of somaclonal variations are yet to be known, possibly due to gene repression such as DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone deacetylation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs), involved in eukaryotic gene regulation by catalyzing the acetyl groups are removal from lysine residues on histone, hence transcriptionally repress gene expression. This paper described the total protein polymorphism profiles of somaclonal variants of oil palm and the effects of histone deacetylation on this phenomenon. Parallel to the different phenotypes, the protein polymorphism profiles of the mantled samples (leaves, fruits, and florets) and the phenotypically normal samples were proven to be different. Higher HDAC activity was found in mantled leaf samples than in the phenotypically normal leaf samples, leading to a preliminary conclusion that histone deacetylation suppressed gene expression and contributed to the development of somaclonal variants.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation/genetics*
  14. Manjeri G, Muhamad R, Faridah QZ, Tan SG
    J. Genet., 2012;91(3):e92-6.
    PMID: 23257301
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  15. Islam MM, Khan MM, Tjong DH, Alam MS, Sumida M
    Zool. Sci., 2008 Mar;25(3):261-72.
    PMID: 18393563 DOI: 10.2108/zsj.25.261
    The present study was conducted to elucidate the genetic divergence and the phylogenetic relationships in the F. limnocharis complex from Bangladesh and other Asian countries such as Sri Lanka, Thailand, Malaysia, Taiwan and Japan by allozyme analyses. We used a total of 95 frogs of the F. limnocharis complex from these countries and F. cancrivora from the Philippines as an outgroup. Based on body size, the F. limnocharis complex from Bangladesh was divided into three distinct groups: large, medium and small types. Allozyme analyses were carried out with 28 loci encoding 20 enzymes and two blood proteins by horizontal starch-gel electrophoresis. When genetic distance was calculated, distinct divergence was found among the three types: mean genetic distance was 0.782 between the small and medium types, 1.458 between the large and medium types, and 1.520 between the large and small types. Phylogenetic trees based on genetic distance showed that all populations of Bangladesh small type strongly formed a cluster and were found to be most closely related to the Sri Lanka population; that all populations of Bangladesh large type formed a very strong cluster and were grouped with several populations from Thailand, Malaysia, Japan, and Taiwan; and that the medium type was segregated from all other groups. This may imply that each of the three types is a different species, and that the medium type is possibly an undescribed taxon.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  16. van Holst Pellekaan SM, Ingman M, Roberts-Thomson J, Harding RM
    Am. J. Phys. Anthropol., 2006 Oct;131(2):282-94.
    PMID: 16596590
    We classified diversity in eight new complete mitochondrial genome sequences and 41 partial sequences from living Aboriginal Australians into five haplogroups. Haplogroup AuB belongs to global lineage M, and AuA, AuC, AuD, and AuE to N. Within N, we recognize subdivisions, assigning AuA to haplogroup S, AuD to haplogroup O, AuC to P4, and AuE to P8. On available evidence, (S)AuA and (M)AuB are widespread in Australia. (P4)AuC is found in the Riverine region of western New South Wales, and was identified by others in northern Australia. (O)AuD and (P8)AuE were clearly identified only from central Australia. Our eight Australian full mt genome sequences, combined with 20 others (Ingman and Gyllensten 2003 Genome Res. 13:1600-1606) and compared with full mt genome sequences from regions to the north that include Papua New Guinea, Malaya, and Andaman and Nicobar Islands, show that ancestral connections between regions are deep and limited to clustering at the level of the N and M macrohaplogroups. The Australian-specific distribution of the five haplogroups identified indicates genetic isolation over a long period. Ancestral connections within Australia are deeper than those reflected by known linguistic or culturally based affinities. Applying a coalescence analysis to a gene tree for the coding regions of the eight genomic sequences, we made estimates of time depth that support a continuity of presence for the descendants of a founding population already established by 40,000 years ago.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  17. Wright TF, Johns PM, Walters JR, Lerner AP, Swallow JG, Wilkinson GS
    Genet. Res., 2004 Aug;84(1):27-40.
    PMID: 15663256
    Microsatellite primers are often developed in one species and used to assess neutral variability in related species. Such analyses may be confounded by ascertainment bias (i.e. a decline in amplification success and allelic variability with increasing genetic distance from the source of the microsatellites). In addition, other factors, such as the size of the microsatellite, whether it consists of perfect or interrupted tandem repeats, and whether it is autosomal or X-linked, can affect variation. To test the relative importance of these factors on microsatellite variation, we examine patterns of amplification and allelic diversity in 52 microsatellite loci amplified from five individuals in each of six populations of Cyrtodiopsis stalk-eyed flies that range from 2.2 % to 11.2% mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence from the population used for microsatellite development. We find that amplification success and most measures of allelic diversity declined with genetic distance from the source population, in some cases an order of magnitude faster than in birds or mammals. The median and range of the repeat array length did not decline with genetic distance. In addition, for loci on the X chromosome, we find evidence of lower observed heterozygosity compared with loci on autosomes. The differences in variability between X-linked and autosomal loci are not adequately explained by differences in effective population sizes of the chromosomes. We suggest, instead, that periodic selection events associated with X-chromosome meiotic drive, which is present in many of these populations, reduces X-linked variation.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  18. Taheri S, Abdullah TL, Abdullah NA, Ahmad Z
    Genet. Mol. Res., 2012;11(3):3069-76.
    PMID: 23007984
    The genus Curcuma is a member of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) that has recently become popular for use as flowering pot plants, both indoors and as patio and landscape plants. We used PCR-based molecular markers (ISSRs) to assess genetic variation and relationships between five varieties of curcuma (Curcuma alismatifolia) cultivated in Malaysia. Sixteen ISSR primers generated 139 amplified fragments, of which 77% had high polymorphism among these varieties. These markers were used to estimate genetic similarity among the varieties using Jaccard's similarity coefficient. The similarity matrix was used to construct a dendrogram, and a principal component plot was developed to examine genetic relationships among varieties. Similarity coefficient values ranged from 0.40 to 0.58 (with a mean of 0.5) among the five varieties. The mean value of number of observed alleles, number of effective alleles, mean Nei's gene diversity, and Shannon's information index were 8.69, 1.48, 0.29, and 0.43, respectively.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  19. Babaei N, Abdullah NA, Saleh G, Abdullah TL
    Mol. Biol. Rep., 2012 Nov;39(11):9869-77.
    PMID: 22752726
    Curculin, a sweet protein found in Curculigo latifolia fruit has great potential for the pharmaceutical industry. This protein interestingly has been found to have both sweet taste and taste-modifying capacities comparable with other natural sweeteners. According to our knowledge this is the first reported case on the isolation of microsatellite loci in this genus. Hence, the current development of microsatellite markers for C. latifolia will facilitate future population genetic studies and breeding programs for this valuable plant. In this study 11 microsatellite markers were developed using 3' and 5' ISSR markers. The primers were tested on 27 accessions from all states of Peninsular Malaysia. The number of alleles per locus ranged from three to seven, with allele size ranging from 141 to 306 bp. The observed and expected heterozygosity ranged between 0.00-0.65 and 0.38-0.79, respectively. The polymorphic information content ranged from 0.35 to 0.74 and the Shannon's information index ranged from 0.82 to 1.57. These developed polymorphic microsatellites were used for constructing a dendrogram by unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analysis using the Dice's similarity coefficient. Accessions association according to their geographical origin was observed. Based on characteristics of isolated microsatellites for C. latifolia accessions all genotype can be distinguished using these 11 microsatellite markers. These polymorphic markers could also be applied to studies on uniformity determination and somaclonal variation of tissue culture plantlets, varieties identification, genetic diversity, analysis of phylogenetic relationship, genetic linkage maps and quantitative trait loci in C. latifolia.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
  20. Kreike CM, Van Eck HJ, Lebot V
    Theor. Appl. Genet., 2004 Aug;109(4):761-8.
    PMID: 15156282
    The genetic diversity of 255 taro (Colocasia esculenta) accessions from Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia,Indonesia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu was studied using AFLPs. Three AFLP primer combinations generated a total of 465 scorable amplification products. The 255 accessions were grouped according to their country of origin, to their ploidy level (diploid or triploid) and to their habitat--cultivated or wild. Gene diversity within these groups and the genetic distance between these groups were computed. Dendrograms were constructed using UPGMA cluster analysis. In each country, the gene diversity within the groups of wild genotypes was the highest compared to the diploid and triploid cultivars groups. The highest gene diversity was observed for the wild group from Thailand (0.19), the lowest for the diploid cultivars group from Thailand(0.007). In Malaysia there was hardly any difference between the gene diversity of the cultivars and wild groups, 0.07 and 0.08, respectively. The genetic distances between the diploid cultivars groups ranges from 0.02 to 0.10, with the distance between the diploid accessions from Thailand and Malaysia being the highest. The genetic distances between the wild groups range from 0.05 to 0.07. First, a dendrogram was constructed with only the diploids cultivars from all countries. The accessions formed clusters largely according to the country from which they originated. Two major groups of clusters were revealed, one group assembling accessions from Asian countries and the other assembling accessions from the Pacific. Surprisingly, the group of diploid cultivars from Thailand clustered among the Pacific countries. Secondly,a dendrogram was constructed with diploid cultivated,triploid cultivated and wild accessions. Again the division of the accessions into an Asian and a Pacific gene pool is obvious. The presence of two gene pools for cultivated diploid taro has major implications for the breeding and conservation of germplasm.
    Matched MeSH terms: Genetic Variation*
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