Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 22 in total

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  1. Ahn JY, Boettiger D, Law M, Kumarasamy N, Yunihastuti E, Chaiwarith R, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2015 Jul 1;69(3):e85-92.
    PMID: 25850606 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000634
    Current treatment guidelines for HIV infection recommend routine CD4 lymphocyte (CD4) count monitoring in patients with viral suppression. This may have a limited impact on influencing care as clinically meaningful CD4 decline rarely occurs during viral suppression.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  2. Hora B, Keating SM, Chen Y, Sanchez AM, Sabino E, Hunt G, et al.
    PLoS ONE, 2016;11(6):e0157340.
    PMID: 27314585 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0157340
    HIV-1 subtypes and drug resistance are routinely tested by many international surveillance groups. However, results from different sites often vary. A systematic comparison of results from multiple sites is needed to determine whether a standardized protocol is required for consistent and accurate data analysis. A panel of well-characterized HIV-1 isolates (N = 50) from the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL) was assembled for evaluation at seven international sites. This virus panel included seven subtypes, six circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), nine unique recombinant forms (URFs) and three group O viruses. Seven viruses contained 10 major drug resistance mutations (DRMs). HIV-1 isolates were prepared at a concentration of 107 copies/ml and compiled into blinded panels. Subtypes and DRMs were determined with partial or full pol gene sequences by conventional Sanger sequencing and/or Next Generation Sequencing (NGS). Subtype and DRM results were reported and decoded for comparison with full-length genome sequences generated by EQAPOL. The partial pol gene was amplified by RT-PCR and sequenced for 89.4%-100% of group M viruses at six sites. Subtyping results of majority of the viruses (83%-97.9%) were correctly determined for the partial pol sequences. All 10 major DRMs in seven isolates were detected at these six sites. The complete pol gene sequence was also obtained by NGS at one site. However, this method missed six group M viruses and sequences contained host chromosome fragments. Three group O viruses were only characterized with additional group O-specific RT-PCR primers employed by one site. These results indicate that PCR protocols and subtyping tools should be standardized to efficiently amplify diverse viruses and more consistently assign virus genotypes, which is critical for accurate global subtype and drug resistance surveillance. Targeted NGS analysis of partial pol sequences can serve as an alternative approach, especially for detection of low-abundance DRMs.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects
  3. Jiamsakul A, Chaiwarith R, Durier N, Sirivichayakul S, Kiertiburanakul S, Van Den Eede P, et al.
    J. Med. Virol., 2016 Feb;88(2):234-43.
    PMID: 26147742 DOI: 10.1002/jmv.24320
    HIV drug resistance assessments and interpretations can be obtained from genotyping (GT), virtual phenotyping (VP) and laboratory-based phenotyping (PT). We compared resistance calls obtained from GT and VP with those from PT (GT-PT and VP-PT) among CRF01_AE and subtype B HIV-1 infected patients. GT predictions were obtained from the Stanford HIV database. VP and PT were obtained from Janssen Diagnostics BVBA's vircoType(TM) HIV-1 and Antivirogram®, respectively. With PT assumed as the "gold standard," the area under the curve (AUC) and the Bland-Altman plot were used to assess the level of agreement in resistance interpretations. A total of 80 CRF01_AE samples from Asia and 100 subtype B from Janssen Diagnostics BVBA's database were analysed. CRF01_AE showed discordances ranging from 3 to 27 samples for GT-PT and 1 to 20 samples for VP-PT. The GT-PT and VP-PT AUCs were 0.76-0.97 and 0.81-0.99, respectively. Subtype B showed 3-61 discordances for GT-PT and 2-75 discordances for VP-PT. The AUCs ranged from 0.55 to 0.95 for GT-PT and 0.55 to 0.97 for VP-PT. Didanosine had the highest proportion of discordances and/or AUC in all comparisons. The patient with the largest didanosine FC difference in each subtype harboured Q151M mutation. Overall, GT and VP predictions for CRF01_AE performed significantly better than subtype B for three NRTIs. Although discrepancies exist, GT and VP resistance interpretations in HIV-1 CRF01_AE strains were highly robust in comparison with the gold-standard PT.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  4. Ali MA, Ismail R, Choon TS, Yoon YK, Wei AC, Pandian S, et al.
    Acta Pol Pharm, 2011 May-Jun;68(3):343-8.
    PMID: 21648188
    A series of novel 3-(substituted phenyl)-6,7-dimethoxy-3a,4-dihydro-3H-indeno[1,2-c]isoxazole analogues were synthesized by the reaction of 5,6-dimethoxy-2-[(E)-1-phenylmethylidene]-1-indanone with hydroxylamine hydrochloride. The title compounds were tested for their in vitro anti-HIV activity. Among the compounds, (4g) showed a promising anti-HIV activity in the in vitro testing against IIIB and ROD strains. The IC50 of both IIIB and ROD were found to be 9.05 microM and > 125 microM, respectively.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  5. Jasamai M, Simons C, Balzarini J
    PMID: 20589572 DOI: 10.1080/15257771003781634
    Acyclic nucleosides have been of considerable interest since the approval of aciclovir by the FDA to be used as an antiviral agent in the 1990s. The acyclic moieties and the bases used in the experiment were either available commercially or synthesized using literature methods. Vorbruggen coupling method was utilized involving reaction of persilylated heterocyclic bases with the appropriate acyclic moiety in the presence of a Lewis acid catalyst. A series of novel 6-azapyrimidine acyclic oxosugar nucleosides was successfully synthesized with a promising yield (more than 50%). An efficient method of protection and deprotection was also investigated.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects
  6. Saoin S, Wisitponchai T, Intachai K, Chupradit K, Moonmuang S, Nangola S, et al.
    Asian Pac. J. Allergy Immunol., 2018 06;36(2):126-135.
    PMID: 28802032 DOI: 10.12932/AP-280217-0037
    BACKGROUND: AnkGAG1D4 is an artificial ankyrin repeat protein which recognizes the capsid protein (CA) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and exhibits the intracellular antiviral activity on the viral assembly process. Improving the binding affinity of AnkGAG1D4 would potentially enhance the AnkGAG1D4-mediated antiviral activity.

    OBJECTIVE: To augment the affinity of AnkGAG1D4 scaffold towards its CA target, through computational predictions and experimental designs.

    METHOD: Three dimensional structure of the binary complex formed by AnkGAG1D4 docked to the CA was used as a model for van der Waals (vdW) binding energy calculation. The results generated a simple guideline to select the amino acids for modifications. Following the predictions, modified AnkGAG1D4 proteins were produced and further evaluated for their CA-binding activity, using ELISA-modified method and bio-layer interferometry (BLI).

    RESULTS: Tyrosine at position 56 (Y56) in AnkGAG1D4 was experimentally identified as the most critical residue for CA binding. Rational substitutions of this residue diminished the binding affinity. However, vdW calculation preconized to substitute serine for tyrosine at position 45. Remarkably, the affinity for the viral CA was significantly enhanced in AnkGAG1D4-S45Y mutant, with no alteration of the target specificity.

    CONCLUSIONS: The S-to-Y mutation at position 45, based on the prediction of interacting amino acids and on vdW binding energy calculation, resulted in a significant enhancement of the affinity of AnkGAG1D4 ankyrin for its CA target. AnkGAG1D4-S45Y mutant represented the starting point for further construction of variants with even higher affinity towards the viral CA, and higher therapeutic potential in the future.

    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  7. Gill MSA, Hassan SS, Ahemad N
    Eur J Med Chem, 2019 Oct 01;179:423-448.
    PMID: 31265935 DOI: 10.1016/j.ejmech.2019.06.058
    HIV infection is a major challenge to mankind and a definitive cure or a viable vaccine for HIV is still elusive. HIV-1 is constantly evolving and developing resistant against clinically used anti-HIV drugs thus posing serious hurdles in the treatment of HIV infection. This prompts the need to developed new anti-HIV drugs; preferentially adopting intelligent ways to counteract an evolving virus. Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART): a strategy involving multiple targeting through various drugs has proven beneficial in the management of AIDS. However, it is a complex regimen with high drug load, increased risk of drug interactions and adverse effects, which lead to poor patient compliance. Reverse transcriptase (RT) and Integrase (IN) are two pivotal enzymes in HIV-1 lifecycle with high structural and functional analogy to be perceived as drug-able targets for novel dual-purpose inhibitors. Designed multi-functional ligand (DML) is a modern strategy by which multiple targets can be exploited using a single chemical entity. A single chemical entity acting on multiple targets can be much more effective than a complex multi-drug regimen. The development of such multifunctional ligands is highly valued in anti-HIV drug discovery with the proposed advantage of being able to stop two or more stages of viral replication cycle. This review will encompass the evolution of the RT-IN dual inhibitory scaffolds reported so far and the contribution made by the leading research groups over the years in this field.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  8. Rhee SY, Blanco JL, Jordan MR, Taylor J, Lemey P, Varghese V, et al.
    PLoS Med., 2015 Apr;12(4):e1001810.
    PMID: 25849352 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001810
    BACKGROUND: Regional and subtype-specific mutational patterns of HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) are essential for informing first-line antiretroviral (ARV) therapy guidelines and designing diagnostic assays for use in regions where standard genotypic resistance testing is not affordable. We sought to understand the molecular epidemiology of TDR and to identify the HIV-1 drug-resistance mutations responsible for TDR in different regions and virus subtypes.

    METHODS AND FINDINGS: We reviewed all GenBank submissions of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase sequences with or without protease and identified 287 studies published between March 1, 2000, and December 31, 2013, with more than 25 recently or chronically infected ARV-naïve individuals. These studies comprised 50,870 individuals from 111 countries. Each set of study sequences was analyzed for phylogenetic clustering and the presence of 93 surveillance drug-resistance mutations (SDRMs). The median overall TDR prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), south/southeast Asia (SSEA), upper-income Asian countries, Latin America/Caribbean, Europe, and North America was 2.8%, 2.9%, 5.6%, 7.6%, 9.4%, and 11.5%, respectively. In SSA, there was a yearly 1.09-fold (95% CI: 1.05-1.14) increase in odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up attributable to an increase in non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance. The odds of NNRTI-associated TDR also increased in Latin America/Caribbean (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16; 95% CI: 1.06-1.25), North America (OR = 1.19; 95% CI: 1.12-1.26), Europe (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 1.01-1.13), and upper-income Asian countries (OR = 1.33; 95% CI: 1.12-1.55). In SSEA, there was no significant change in the odds of TDR since national ARV scale-up (OR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.92-1.02). An analysis limited to sequences with mixtures at less than 0.5% of their nucleotide positions—a proxy for recent infection—yielded trends comparable to those obtained using the complete dataset. Four NNRTI SDRMs—K101E, K103N, Y181C, and G190A—accounted for >80% of NNRTI-associated TDR in all regions and subtypes. Sixteen nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) SDRMs accounted for >69% of NRTI-associated TDR in all regions and subtypes. In SSA and SSEA, 89% of NNRTI SDRMs were associated with high-level resistance to nevirapine or efavirenz, whereas only 27% of NRTI SDRMs were associated with high-level resistance to zidovudine, lamivudine, tenofovir, or abacavir. Of 763 viruses with TDR in SSA and SSEA, 725 (95%) were genetically dissimilar; 38 (5%) formed 19 sequence pairs. Inherent limitations of this study are that some cohorts may not represent the broader regional population and that studies were heterogeneous with respect to duration of infection prior to sampling.

    CONCLUSIONS: Most TDR strains in SSA and SSEA arose independently, suggesting that ARV regimens with a high genetic barrier to resistance combined with improved patient adherence may mitigate TDR increases by reducing the generation of new ARV-resistant strains. A small number of NNRTI-resistance mutations were responsible for most cases of high-level resistance, suggesting that inexpensive point-mutation assays to detect these mutations may be useful for pre-therapy screening in regions with high levels of TDR. In the context of a public health approach to ARV therapy, a reliable point-of-care genotypic resistance test could identify which patients should receive standard first-line therapy and which should receive a protease-inhibitor-containing regimen.

    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects
  9. Naftalin CM, Wong NS, Chan DP, Wong KH, Reidpath DD, Lee SS
    Int J STD AIDS, 2015 Oct;26(11):803-9.
    PMID: 25281539 DOI: 10.1177/0956462414553826
    To explore the heterogeneity of CD4 responses following highly active antiretroviral therapy, the patterns of CD4 recovery of HIV-1-infected Chinese patients who have been on their first antiretroviral regimen for ≥5 years were analysed. The CD4 trajectories were traced, smoothed and differentiated into three defined profiles. Half (56.3%) were 'satisfactory responders', with CD4 gain of >100 cells/μL and a peak of >350 cells/μL, plateauing before the end of Year 5. Thirty-three (24.4%) were 'continuing responders' whose CD4 rise persisted at Year 4-5. The remaining 26 (19.3%) were 'poor responders'. Presentation with AIDS before therapy was common not just among 'poor' but also paradoxically the 'continuing' responders. While a majority had responded well to antiretroviral therapy, older patients and those with AIDS diagnosis before initiation of therapy may never achieve a satisfactory level even with effective treatment. Categorization of HIV patients by their CD4 trajectory may support the prediction of immunological outcome over time, and ultimately inform treatment choices.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  10. Phanuphak P, Sirivichayakul S, Jiamsakul A, Sungkanuparph S, Kumarasamy N, Lee MP, et al.
    J. Acquir. Immune Defic. Syndr., 2014 May 1;66(1):74-9.
    PMID: 24413039 DOI: 10.1097/QAI.0000000000000108
    We compared treatment outcomes of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) in patients on fully or partially sensitive drug regimens.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  11. Chen M, Wong WW, Law MG, Kiertiburanakul S, Yunihastuti E, Merati TP, et al.
    PLoS ONE, 2016;11(3):e0150512.
    PMID: 26933963 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0150512
    BACKGROUND: We assessed the effects of hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection on outcomes of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD), a multi-center cohort of HIV-infected patients in the Asia-Pacific region.

    METHODS: Patients testing HBs antigen (Ag) or HCV antibody (Ab) positive within enrollment into TAHOD were considered HBV or HCV co-infected. Factors associated with HBV and/or HCV co-infection were assessed by logistic regression models. Factors associated with post-ART HIV immunological response (CD4 change after six months) and virological response (HIV RNA <400 copies/ml after 12 months) were also determined. Survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test.

    RESULTS: A total of 7,455 subjects were recruited by December 2012. Of patients tested, 591/5656 (10.4%) were HBsAg positive, 794/5215 (15.2%) were HCVAb positive, and 88/4966 (1.8%) were positive for both markers. In multivariate analysis, HCV co-infection, age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, and HIV-1 subtype were associated with immunological recovery. Age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, ART regimen, prior ART and HIV-1 subtype, but not HBV or HCV co-infection, affected HIV RNA suppression. Risk factors affecting mortality included HCV co-infection, age, CDC stage, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA and prior mono/dual ART. Shortest survival was seen in subjects who were both HBV- and HCV-positive.

    CONCLUSION: In this Asian cohort of HIV-infected patients, HCV co-infection, but not HBV co-infection, was associated with lower CD4 cell recovery after ART and increased mortality.

    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects
  12. Cain LE, Phillips A, Lodi S, Sabin C, Bansi L, Justice A, et al.
    AIDS, 2012 Aug 24;26(13):1691-705.
    PMID: 22546987
    OBJECTIVE: To compare regimens consisting of either efavirenz or nevirapine and two or more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) among HIV-infected, antiretroviral-naive, and AIDS-free individuals with respect to clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes.

    DESIGN: Prospective studies of HIV-infected individuals in Europe and the US included in the HIV-CAUSAL Collaboration.

    METHODS: Antiretroviral therapy-naive and AIDS-free individuals were followed from the time they started an NRTI, efavirenz or nevirapine, classified as following one or both types of regimens at baseline, and censored when they started an ineligible drug or at 6 months if their regimen was not yet complete. We estimated the 'intention-to-treat' effect for nevirapine versus efavirenz regimens on clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes. Our models included baseline covariates and adjusted for potential bias introduced by censoring via inverse probability weighting.

    RESULTS: A total of 15 336 individuals initiated an efavirenz regimen (274 deaths, 774 AIDS-defining illnesses) and 8129 individuals initiated a nevirapine regimen (203 deaths, 441 AIDS-defining illnesses). The intention-to-treat hazard ratios [95% confidence interval (CI)] for nevirapine versus efavirenz regimens were 1.59 (1.27, 1.98) for death and 1.28 (1.09, 1.50) for AIDS-defining illness. Individuals on nevirapine regimens experienced a smaller 12-month increase in CD4 cell count by 11.49 cells/μl and were 52% more likely to have virologic failure at 12 months as those on efavirenz regimens.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our intention-to-treat estimates are consistent with a lower mortality, a lower incidence of AIDS-defining illness, a larger 12-month increase in CD4 cell count, and a smaller risk of virologic failure at 12 months for efavirenz compared with nevirapine.

    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  13. Sungkanuparph S, Oyomopito R, Sirivichayakul S, Sirisanthana T, Li PC, Kantipong P, et al.
    Clin. Infect. Dis., 2011 Apr 15;52(8):1053-7.
    PMID: 21460324 DOI: 10.1093/cid/cir107
    Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  14. Tee KK, Kamarulzaman A, Ng KP
    Med. Microbiol. Immunol., 2006 Jun;195(2):107-12.
    PMID: 16404607
    To assess the prevalence of major drug resistance mutations in antiretroviral (ARV)-treated patients with detectable viral load (VL) in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, genotypic resistance testing was performed among treated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) patients attending the University Malaya Medical Center between July 2003 and November 2004. The reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease genes from 36 plasma samples with detectable VL were examined for major mutations associated with ARV resistance as reported by the International AIDS Society-USA Drug Resistance Mutations Group. The prevalence of patients with at least one major mutation conferring drug resistance to nucleoside RT inhibitors (NRTIs), non-NRTIs (NNRTIs) or protease inhibitors (PIs) was 77.8%. In the RT gene, the frequency of mutations associated with NRTIs and NNRTIs resistance was 52.8 and 63.9%, respectively, with M184V and K103N mutations being selected most frequently by these drugs. A patient with Q151M mutation complex was also detected. Twenty-two percent of the patients had mutations associated with PIs. The following pattern of prevalence of ARV-resistant HIV-1 variants was observed: NNRTI-resistant > NRTI-resistant > PI-resistant. The prevalence of major drug resistance mutations among ARV-treated patients with detectable VL is high in Kuala Lumpur. Genotypic drug resistance testing is therefore important for monitoring patients experiencing ARV regimen failure.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  15. Lam EP, Moore CL, Gotuzzo E, Nwizu C, Kamarulzaman A, Chetchotisakd P, et al.
    AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses, 2016 09;32(9):841-50.
    PMID: 27346600 DOI: 10.1089/AID.2015.0331
    We investigate mutations and correlates according to HIV-1 subtype after virological failure (VF) of standard first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) (non-nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor [NNRTI] +2 nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor [N(t)RTI]). SECOND-LINE study participants were assessed at baseline for HIV-1 subtype, demographics, HIV-1 history, ART exposure, viral load (VL), CD4(+) count, and genotypic ART resistance. We used backward stepwise multivariate regression (MVR) to assess associations between baseline variables and presence of ≥3 N(t)RTI mutations, ≥1 NNRTI mutation, ≥3 thymidine analog-N(t)RTI [ta-N(t)RTI] mutations (TAMs), the K65/K70 mutation, and predicted etravirine (ETV)/rilpivirine (RPV) activity. The inclusion p-value for MVR was p  .05. Of 541 participants, 491 (91%) had successfully characterized baseline viral isolates. Subtype distribution: B (n = 123, 25%), C (n = 202, 41%), CRF01_AE (n = 109, 22%), G (n = 25, 5%), and CRF02_AG (n = 27, 5%). Baseline CD4(+) 200-394 cells/mm(3) were associated with <3 N(t)RTI mutations (OR = 0.47; 95% CI 0.29-0.77; p = .003), absence of the K65/K70 mutation (OR = 0.43; 95% CI 0.26-0.73; p = .002), and higher ETV sensitivity (OR = 0.52; 95% CI 0.35-0.78; p = .002). Recent tenofovir (TDF) use was associated with K65/K70 mutations (OR = 8.91; 95% CI 5.00-15.85; p HIV-1 subtypes in this study are consistent with knowledge derived from subtype B, with some exceptions. Patterns of resistance after failure of a first-line ta-N(t)RTI regimen support using TDF in N(t)RTI-containing second-line regimens, or using N(t)RTI-sparing regimens.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  16. Xu ZQ, Kern ER, Westbrook L, Allen LB, Buckheit RW, Tseng CK, et al.
    Antivir. Chem. Chemother., 2000 Jan;11(1):23-9.
    PMID: 10693651
    Plant-derived and semi-synthetic calanolide compounds with anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity were tested for anti-human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) activity in both cytopathic effect inhibition and plaque reduction assays. The results indicated that the anti-HCMV activity of calanolide compounds does not correlate with their activity against HIV-1. The semi-synthetic 12-keto derivatives tended to be more active against HCMV than the corresponding 12-OH congeners, which were more active against HIV-1. It appeared that the 7,8-unsaturated double bond in the chromene ring played a certain role in maintaining activities against both HCMV and HIV-1. Saturation of the double bond increased the EC50 values against both viruses, with concomitant increase in toxicity. The calanolide compounds reported here are the first non-nucleoside analogues capable of inhibiting both HIV-1 and HCMV and, therefore, may be useful chemoprophylactic agents for HCMV in HIV-infected people or vice versa.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  17. Che Nordin MA, Teow SY
    Molecules, 2018 Feb 06;23(2).
    PMID: 29415435 DOI: 10.3390/molecules23020335
    The discovery of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in 1996 has significantly reduced the global mortality and morbidity caused by the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, the therapeutic strategy of HAART that targets multiple viral proteins may render off-target toxicity and more importantly results in drug-resistant escape mutants. These have been the main challenges for HAART and refinement of this therapeutic strategy is urgently needed. Antibody-mediated treatments are emerging therapeutic modalities for various diseases. Most therapeutic antibodies have been approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) mainly for targeting cancers. Previous studies have also demonstrated the promising effect of therapeutic antibodies against HIV-1, but there are several limitations in this therapy, particularly when the viral targets are intracellular proteins. The conventional antibodies do not cross the cell membrane, hence, the pathogenic intracellular proteins cannot be targeted with this classical therapeutic approach. Over the years, the advancement of antibody engineering has permitted the therapeutic antibodies to comprehensively target both extra- and intra-cellular proteins in various infections and diseases. This review aims to update on the current progress in the development of antibody-based treatment against intracellular targets in HIV-1 infection. We also attempt to highlight the challenges and limitations in the development of antibody-based therapeutic modalities against HIV-1.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  18. Ariffin TA, Mohamad S, Yusuf WN, Shueb RH
    J Infect Dev Ctries, 2014 Aug;8(8):1063-7.
    PMID: 25116676 DOI: 10.3855/jidc.4095
    INTRODUCTION: The widespread use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and continuous reports of HIV-1 strains developing resistance to these drugs is rather alarming, as transmission of resistant viruses to newly infected persons is possible. This study aimed to determine HIV-1 subtypes and the prevalence of primary mutations associated with antiretroviral (ARV) resistance among treatment-naive prisoners on the east coast of Malaysia.
    METHODOLOGY: Viral RNA was extracted from plasma samples of 21 treatment-naive prisoners. Protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) regions were amplified and sequenced. Stanford HIV database algorithms were used for interpretation of resistance, and phylogenetic analysis was performed for subtype assignment.
    RESULTS: In the PR gene, no antiviral resistance-associated mutation was detected. For RT-associated mutations, K103N was the most prevalent in sequenced samples (14.3%). Genetic subtyping on the pol gene revealed that the majority of the prisoners were infected with subtype CRF33_01B (52.4%).
    CONCLUSION: Continuous surveillance of newly infected individuals is required to help strategize the best antiviral treatment for these patients.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects*
  19. Tee KK, Kamarulzaman A, Ng KP
    AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses, 2006 Feb;22(2):121-4.
    PMID: 16478392
    To assess the prevalence of mutations associated with drug resistance in antiretroviral-naive patients in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, genotypic resistance testing was conducted among drug-naive HIV-1 patients attending the University Malaya Medical Center (UMMC) between July 2003 and June 2004. Reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease genes of plasma virions were sequenced from 100 individuals. The majority of the patients were recently diagnosed. Codons 20-255 of the RT and 1-96 of the protease gene were examined for major and minor mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance reported by the International AIDS Society- USA (IAS-USA) Drug Resistance Mutations Group. The prevalence of patients with at least one major mutation conferring drug resistance was 1%, with only one patient having a Y181C amino acid substitution in the RT gene that confers high-level resistance to nevirapine and delavirdine. Minor mutations were detected in high prevalence in the protease gene. Amino acid substitutions I13V, E35D, and M36I were associated with CRF01_AE while L63P, V77I, and I93L were associated with subtype B. Baseline prevalence of major mutations associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs was low among antiretroviral-naive HIV-1 patients, suggesting that routine drug resistance testing may be unnecessary for all individuals newly diagnosed with HIV or all patients beginning antiretroviral therapy.
    Matched MeSH terms: HIV-1/drug effects
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