Affiliations 

  • 1 Nik Azlan Nik Muhamad, NM MEm Med (UKM). Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC) , Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. nikazlanmuhamad@hotmail.com
  • 2 Siti Nidzwani, MM MMed (Anaes) UKM. Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre (UKMMC), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.
Med. J. Malaysia, 2012 Jun;67(3):278-83.
PMID: 23082417 MyJurnal

Abstract

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been standard treatment for all cardiac arrest patients that arrive at the Emergency Department. However it is unclear whether prolonging resuscitation among the elderly victims will provide any benefit or improve outcome. This study is to evaluate factors that can influence outcome of CPR among the elderly, such as time of arrest, duration of CPR, lactate levels and age (among elderly age groups). 89 patients fit the inclusion criteria from January 2007 to January 2009, and all underwent CPR. Lactate levels (p=0.047) and duration of CPR performed (p=0.019) had significant relation to outcome. Time of arrest to CPR and age had no significance. Of 89 patients studied, 4 (4.5%) survived to hospital discharge. The remaining 85 (95.5%) died either in the emergency department, the wards or the Intensive Care Unit. Among the survivors, only 2 (2.3%) functional (independent on activities of daily life) patients were identified. Among the survivors, the mean lactate level was 4.0 mmol/L. The mean lactate levels among the dead were 9.84 mmol/L. The mean length of CPR among the survivors was 5.42 minutes and for the non-survivors, 19.28 minutes. This study reports certain factors such as duration of resuscitation and initial lactate levels that can be valuable tools in decision making when resuscitating an elderly.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.