Affiliations 

  • 1 Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
  • 2 Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia. Electronic address: enoch@upm.edu.my
Biomed. Pharmacother., 2016 Oct;83:1303-1310.
PMID: 27570173 DOI: 10.1016/j.biopha.2016.08.052

Abstract

Zerumbone, a bioactive sesquiterpene isolated from Zingiber zerumbet (Smith), has shown to exert antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects in neuropathic pain mice model in our recent study. The mechanism through which zerumbone alleviates neuropathic pain has yet to be elucidated. Thus, this study aimed to determine whether the serotonergic system, part of the descending pain modulation pathway, contributes to the antineuropathic effect of zerumbone. Participation of the serotonergic system in zerumbone-induced antiallodynia and antihyperalgesia was assessed using Dynamic Plantar Aesthesiometer von Frey test and Hargreaves plantar test respectively in chronic-constriction injury mice model. Administration of ρ-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 100mg/kg, i.p.) for four consecutive days to deplete serotonin (5-HT) prior to zerumbone administration blocked the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone. Further investigation with 5-HT receptor antagonists methiothepin (5-HT1/6/7 receptor antagonist, 0.1mg/kg), WAY-100635 (5-HT1A receptor antagonist, 1mg/kg), isamoltane (5-HT1B receptor antagonist, 2.5mg/kg), ketanserin (5-HT2A receptor antagonist, 0.3mg/kg) and ondansetron (5-HT3 receptor antagonist, 0.5mg/kg) managed to significantly attenuate antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone (10mg/kg). These findings demonstrate that zerumbone alleviates mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia through the descending serotonergic system via 5-HT receptors 1A, 1B, 2A, 3, 6 and 7 in chronic constriction injury neuropathic pain mice.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.