Affiliations 

  • 1 C H Wan Hazmy, MS (Orth). Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Seremban Hospital, Seremban, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia
  • 2 A Parwathi, Dip.Sports Med. Department of Physiotherapy, Seremban Hospital, Seremban, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia
Med. J. Malaysia, 2005 Jul;60 Suppl C:17-21.
PMID: 16381277

Abstract

This retrospective study was conducted in a state hospital set-up and aimed at identifying the magnitude of shoulder dislocations and their demographic data, characteristics of the injury, mechanism and predisposing factors, and the instituted treatment. Patients with radiographic evidence of shoulder dislocation admitted to the hospital from January 1999 to December 2002 were included. Data were recorded from the case notes. There were 105 shoulder dislocations with male predomination in 77% cases and age ranged between 11 and 90 years (average 30.9 years). The right shoulder was affected in 68% of the cases. The contributing events were fall in 37% of cases, road traffic accident 23%, sports 17% and pathological conditions 13%. Anterior dislocation occurred in 96.2% of the cases. Posterior and inferior dislocations encountered in two patients for each type. Twelve dislocations were associated fracture of the greater tuberosity, two each with humeral neck fracture and cerebral injuries. First time dislocation occurred in 73.6% of the cases. The recurrences ranged between 2 to 6 times (average 3.4 times). Closed manipulative reduction and strapping was the definitive treatment in 92.4% of the cases and the remaining needed surgical reconstruction. Four patients had open reduction and internal fixation of the associated fractures while another four had arthroscopic Bankart's repair. In conclusion, shoulder dislocation represents the most common shoulder problems. It afflicted young adults of reproductive age (21-40 years) and participation in sports was a risk factor in men. Women over 40 years and fall were at risk to develop shoulder dislocation.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.