Affiliations 

  • 1 International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
  • 2 Genetic Epidemiology of Cancer team, Inserm, U900, Paris, France
  • 3 Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland
  • 4 Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris 7, Clichy, France
  • 5 INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Health across Generations Team, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France
  • 6 Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany
  • 7 Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany
  • 8 Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece
  • 9 Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy
  • 10 Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy
  • 11 Clinical Medicine and Surgery Department, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy
  • 12 Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, ASP, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, Ragusa, Italy
  • 13 Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Citta' della Salute e della Scienza Hospital, University of Turin and Centre for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy
  • 14 EPIC Asturias, Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain
  • 15 Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain
  • 16 Hospital del Mar Research Institute - IMIM, CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP) and Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
  • 17 Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública. Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA. Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain
  • 18 CIBER in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain
  • 19 Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research institute, San Sebastian, Spain
  • 20 Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 21 Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands
  • 22 University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • 23 Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • 24 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
  • 25 MRC-PHE Center for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
Int J Cancer, 2018 11 15;143(10):2437-2448.
PMID: 30110135 DOI: 10.1002/ijc.31797

Abstract

There are both limited and conflicting data on the role of dietary fat and specific fatty acids in the development of pancreatic cancer. In this study, we investigated the association between plasma phospholipid fatty acids and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. The fatty acid composition was measured by gas chromatography in plasma samples collected at recruitment from375 incident pancreatic cancer cases and375 matched controls. Associations of specific fatty acids with pancreatic cancer risk were evaluated using multivariable conditional logistic regression models with adjustment for established pancreatic cancer risk factors. Statistically significant inverse associations were found between pancreatic cancer incidence and levels of heptadecanoic acid (ORT3-T1 [odds ratio for highest versus lowest tertile] =0.63; 95%CI[confidence interval] = 0.41-0.98; ptrend = 0.036), n-3 polyunsaturated α-linolenic acid (ORT3-T1 = 0.60; 95%CI = 0.39-0.92; ptrend = 0.02) and docosapentaenoic acid (ORT3-T1 = 0.52; 95%CI = 0.32-0.85; ptrend = 0.008). Industrial trans-fatty acids were positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk among men (ORT3-T1 = 3.00; 95%CI = 1.13-7.99; ptrend = 0.029), while conjugated linoleic acids were inversely related to pancreatic cancer among women only (ORT3-T1 = 0.37; 95%CI = 0.17-0.81; ptrend = 0.008). Among current smokers, the long-chain n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk (ORT3-T1 = 3.40; 95%CI = 1.39-8.34; ptrend = 0.007). Results were robust to a range of sensitivity analyses. Our findings suggest that higher circulating levels of saturated fatty acids with an odd number of carbon atoms and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may be related to lower risk of pancreatic cancer. The influence of some fatty acids on the development of pancreatic cancer may be sex-specific and modulated by smoking.

* Title and MeSH Headings from MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.