Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 77 in total

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  1. Sulaiman O, Hashim R, Wahab R, Ismail ZA, Samsi HW, Mohamed A
    Bioresour Technol, 2006 Dec;97(18):2466-9.
    PMID: 16524726
    Studies were carried out on heat treatment of bamboo species Gigantochloa scortechinii Gamble using palm oil. The samples were laminated and glued. The adhesion results showed that the delamination of glue line increased as the temperature and duration of oil heat treatment increased. Maximum load and shear strength of the glue line reduced as the heat treatment become more severe. It was found that the palm oil used as the heating medium penetrated in some parts of the cell wall as well as in the cell lumen of the bamboo.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  2. Chong YH, Ng TKW
    Med J Malaysia, 1991 Mar;46(1):41-50.
    PMID: 1836037
    A major public health concern of affluent nations is the excessive consumption of dietary fats which are now closely linked to coronary heart disease. Against this scenario, the tropical oils and palm oil in particular, have been cast as major villains in the U.S.A., despite the fact that palm oil consumption there is negligible. The unsuspecting public may not realise that the call to avoid palm oil is nothing more than a trade ploy since in recent years palm oil has been very competitive and has gained a major share of the world's edible oils and fats market. Many also lose sight of the fact that, palm oil, like other edible oils and fats, is an important component of the diet. The allegation that palm oil consumption leads to raised blood cholesterol levels and is therefore atherogenic is without scientific foundation. Examination of the chemical and fatty acid composition of palm oil or its liquid fraction should convince most nutritionists that the oil has little cholesterol-raising potential. The rationale for these are: it is considered cholesterol free. its major saturated fatty acid, palmitic acid (16:0) has recently been shown to be neutral in its cholesterolaemic effect, particularly in situations where the LDL receptors have not been down-regulated by dietary means or through a genetic effect. palm oil contains negligible amounts (less than 1.5%) of the hypercholesterolemic saturated fatty acids, namely lauric acid (12:0) and myristic acid (14:0). it has moderately rich amounts of the hypocholesterolaemic, monounsaturated oleic acid (18:1, omega-9) and adequate amounts of linoleic acid. (18:2, omega-6). It contains minor components such as the vitamin E tocotrienols which are not only powerful antioxidants but are also natural inhibitors of cholesterol synthesis. Feeding experiments in various animal species and humans also do not support the allegation that palm oil is atherogenic. On the contrary, palm oil consumption reduces blood cholesterol in comparison with the traditional sources of saturated fats such as coconut oil, dairy and animal fats. In addition, palm oil consumption may raise HDL levels and reduce platelet aggregability. As with all nutrients, there is a need to obtain a balance of different fatty acids found in fats in edible oils and other food sources. There is no single ideal source of fat that answers to the recent American Heart Association's call to reflect a 1:1:1 ratio of saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats in relation to the recommended dietary fat intake of 30% of calories or less.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  3. Ho CL, Tan YC
    Phytochemistry, 2015 Jun;114:168-77.
    PMID: 25457484 DOI: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2014.10.016
    Basal stem rot (BSR) of oil palm roots is due to the invasion of fungal mycelia of Ganoderma species which spreads to the bole of the stem. In addition to root contact, BSR can also spread by airborne basidiospores. These fungi are able to break down cell wall components including lignin. BSR not only decreases oil yield, it also causes the stands to collapse thus causing severe economic loss to the oil palm industry. The transmission and mode of action of Ganoderma, its interactions with oil palm as a hemibiotroph, and the molecular defence responses of oil palm to the infection of Ganoderma boninense in BSR are reviewed, based on the transcript profiles of infected oil palms. The knowledge gaps that need to be filled in oil palm-Ganoderma molecular interactions i.e. the associations of hypersensitive reaction (HR)-induced cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) kinetics to the susceptibility of oil palm to Ganoderma spp., the interactions of phytohormones (salicylate, jasmonate and ethylene) at early and late stages of BSR, and cell wall strengthening through increased production of guaiacyl (G)-type lignin, are also discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  4. Koriem KM
    Asian Pac J Trop Biomed, 2013 Oct;3(10):834-40.
    PMID: 24075352 DOI: 10.1016/S2221-1691(13)60165-3
    Oleum azadirachti consists of the oil obtained from dried seeds of Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (family: Meliaceae). Local names of Azadirachta indica A. Juss. are Abodua, aforo-oyinbo, anwe egyane, arista, azad dirakht, azadarakht, azedarach and bead tree. Indigenous to India, and widely distributed in South and South-East Asia and cultivated in Africa, the South Pacific Islands, South and Central America and Australia, and in southern Florida and California, United States of America, it is a straight-boled deciduous tree, which is 6-25 m high. Bark is dark-brown, externally fissured with a buff inner surface and fibrous fracture. Leaves alternately arranged, pinnately compound and up to 40 cm long, and composed of 8-18 short-petiolate narrow-ovate, pointed and curved toothed leaflets, 3-10 cm long and 1-4 cm wide arranged in alternate pairs. The major constituents are oxidized tetranortriterpenes including azadirachtin (azadirachtin A), azadiriadione, epoxyazadiradione, azadirone, nimbidin, nimbin, deacetylnimbin, salannin, gedunin, mahmoodin, 17-hydroxydiradione and related derivatives. It is of various medicinal uses, such as a contraceptive for intravaginal use, a mosquito repellent, and treatment of vaginal infections, treatment of gastric ulcers, cardiovascular disease, malaria, rheumatism and skin disorders, external applications for treatment of septic wounds, ulcers and boils, treatment of allergic skin reactions, asthma, bruises, colic, conjunctivitis, dysmenorrhoea, fever, gout, headache, itching due to varicella, kidney stones, leukorrhoea, psoriasis, scabies, sprains and muscular pain, and wounds. It is also used as an emmenagogue, tonic, stomatic and vermicide. In conclusion, the plant oil had antifertility, antihyperglycaemic, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, antiulcer, estrogenic, immune, contraceptive, antibacterial, insect repellent, and skin treatment effects.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  5. Han YZ, Ren TJ, Jiang ZQ, Jiang BQ, Gao J, Koshio S, et al.
    Fish Physiol Biochem, 2012 Dec;38(6):1785-1794.
    PMID: 22763698 DOI: 10.1007/s10695-012-9675-4
    A 60-day feeding trial was conducted to determine the effects of palm oil blended with oxidized and non-oxidized fish oil on growth performances, hematology, and non-specific immune response in juvenile Japanese sea bass, Lateolabrax japonicas. Japanese sea bass (1.73 ± 0.01 g) were fed seven experimental diets containing 100 g/kg of dietary lipid in forms of palm oil (10P), fish oil (10F), fish oil blended with palm oil at different ratios, 6:4 (6F4P) and 4:6 (4F6P), oxidized fish oil (10OF), and oxidized fish oil blended with palm oil at different ratios, 6:4 (6OF4P) and 4:6 (4OF6P). After the feeding trial, the following results were illustrated. No significant effects were observed in survival, feed conversion ratio, condition factor, and hematocrit after feeding with experimental diets for 60 days. The relatively higher specific growth rate and hematology were observed in 6F4P. Furthermore, both palm oil and oxidized fish oil acted as a negatively on serum lysozyme activity (P < 0.05). This study suggested that a ration of 6F4P is recommended as an innocuous ratio for Japanese sea bass. Furthermore, according to the present investigation, palm oil seems to have the ability to improve the protein efficiency when added to oxidized fish diets as well as a positive trend to the growth performance (P > 0.05).
    Matched MeSH terms: Fish Oils/pharmacology*; Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  6. Borhan FP, Abd Gani SS, Shamsuddin R
    ScientificWorldJournal, 2014;2014:173979.
    PMID: 25548777 DOI: 10.1155/2014/173979
    Okara, soybean waste from tofu and soymilk production, was utilised as a natural antioxidant in soap formulation for stratum corneum application. D-optimal mixture design was employed to investigate the influence of the main compositions of okara soap containing different fatty acid and oils (virgin coconut oil A (24-28% w/w), olive oil B (15-20% w/w), palm oil C (6-10% w/w), castor oil D (15-20% w/w), cocoa butter E (6-10% w/w), and okara F (2-7% w/w)) by saponification process on the response hardness of the soap. The experimental data were utilized to carry out analysis of variance (ANOVA) and to develop a polynomial regression model for okara soap hardness in terms of the six design factors considered in this study. Results revealed that the best mixture was the formulation that included 26.537% A, 19.999% B, 9.998% C, 16.241% D, 7.633% E, and 7.000% F. The results proved that the difference in the level of fatty acid and oils in the formulation significantly affects the hardness of soap. Depending on the desirable level of those six variables, creation of okara based soap with desirable properties better than those of commercial ones is possible.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  7. Yap PS, Lim SH, Hu CP, Yiap BC
    Phytomedicine, 2013 Jun 15;20(8-9):710-3.
    PMID: 23537749 DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2013.02.013
    In this study we investigated the relationship between several selected commercially available essential oils and beta-lactam antibiotics on their antibacterial effect against multidrug resistant bacteria. The antibacterial activity of essential oils and antibiotics was assessed using broth microdilution. The combined effects between essential oils of cinnamon bark, lavender, marjoram, tea tree, peppermint and ampicillin, piperacillin, cefazolin, cefuroxime, carbenicillin, ceftazidime, meropenem, were evaluated by means of the checkerboard method against beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli. In the latter assays, fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) values were calculated to characterize interaction between the combinations. Substantial susceptibility of the bacteria toward natural antibiotics and a considerable reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the antibiotics were noted in some paired combinations of antibiotics and essential oils. Out of 35 antibiotic-essential oil pairs tested, four of them showed synergistic effect (FIC≤0.5) and 31 pairs showed no interaction (FIC>0.5-4.0). The preliminary results obtained highlighted the occurrence of a pronounced synergistic relationship between piperacillin/cinnamon bark oil, piperacillin/lavender oil, piperacillin/peppermint oil as well as meropenem/peppermint oil against two of the three bacteria under study with a FIC index in the range 0.26-0.5. The finding highlighted the potential of peppermint, cinnamon bark and lavender essential oils being as antibiotic resistance modifying agent. Reduced usage of antibiotics could be employed as a treatment strategy to decrease the adverse effects and possibly to reverse the beta-lactam antibiotic resistance.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  8. Bimakr M, Rahman RA, Taip FS, Adzahan NM, Sarker MZ, Ganjloo A
    Molecules, 2012 Oct 08;17(10):11748-62.
    PMID: 23044712 DOI: 10.3390/molecules171011748
    In the present study, ultrasound-assisted extraction of crude oil from winter melon seeds was investigated through response surface methodology (RSM). Process variables were power level (25-75%), temperature (45-55 °C) and sonication time (20-40 min). It was found that all process variables have significant (p < 0.05) effects on the response variable. A central composite design (CCD) was used to determine the optimum process conditions. Optimal conditions were identified as 65% power level, 52 °C temperature and 36 min sonication time for maximum crude yield (108.62 mg-extract/g-dried matter). The antioxidant activity, total phenolic content and fatty acid composition of extract obtained under optimized conditions were determined and compared with those of oil obtained by the Soxhlet method. It was found that crude extract yield (CEY) of ultrasound-assisted extraction was lower than that of the Soxhlet method, whereas antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of the extract obtained by ultrasound-assisted extraction were clearly higher than those of the Soxhlet extract. Furthermore, both extracts were rich in unsaturated fatty acids. The major fatty acids of the both extracts were linoleic acid and oleic acid.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  9. Teng KT, Voon PT, Cheng HM, Nesaretnam K
    Lipids, 2010 May;45(5):385-92.
    PMID: 20437207 DOI: 10.1007/s11745-010-3416-1
    Knowledge about the effects of dietary fats on subclinical inflammation and cardiovascular disease risk are mainly derived from studies conducted in Western populations. Little information is available on South East Asian countries. This current study investigated the chronic effects on serum inflammatory markers, lipids, and lipoproteins of three vegetable oils. Healthy, normolipidemic subjects (n = 41; 33 females, 8 males) completed a randomized, single-blind, crossover study. The subjects consumed high oleic palm olein (HOPO diet: 15% of energy 18:1n-9, 9% of energy 16:0), partially hydrogenated soybean oil (PHSO diet: 7% of energy 18:1n-9, 10% of energy 18:1 trans) and an unhydrogenated palm stearin (PST diet: 11% of energy 18:1n-9, 14% of energy 16:0). Each dietary period lasted 5 weeks with a 7 days washout period. The PHSO diet significantly increased serum concentrations of high sensitivity C-reactive protein compared to HOPO and PST diets (by 26, 23%, respectively; P < 0.05 for both) and significantly decreased interleukin-8 (IL-8) compared to PST diet (by 12%; P < 0.05). In particular PHSO diet, and also PST diet, significantly increased total:HDL cholesterol ratio compared to HOPO diet (by 23, 13%, respectively; P < 0.05), with the PST diet having a lesser effect than the PHSO diet (by 8%; P < 0.05). The use of vegetable oils in their natural state might be preferred over one that undergoes the process of hydrogenation in modulating blood lipids and inflammation.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  10. Jamal P, Alam MZ, Suhani F
    Med J Malaysia, 2008 Jul;63 Suppl A:107-8.
    PMID: 19025008
    Large quantities of agro-based liquid wastes are produced every year and their disposal is often a problem for industries. In light of that, in this study prudent effort was done to screen the agro-industrial wastes - pineapple waste (PAW) and palm oil mill effluent (POME) for valuable biophenols product. Three different solvents; ethanol, acetone and distilled water were screened in order to enhance the process. All experiments were performed using fixed process conditions of solid to solvent ratio, temperatures, time and agitation speed. Effectiveness of extraction process to produce biophenol was based on high amount with more activity. POME was selected as potential source with biophenol content of 125.42 mg/L GAE.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  11. Sundram K, Khor HT, Ong AS
    Lipids, 1990 Apr;25(4):187-93.
    PMID: 2345491
    Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed semipurified diets containing 20% fat for 15 weeks. The dietary fats were corn oil, soybean oil, palm oil, palm olein and palm stearin. No differences in the body and organ weights of rats fed the various diets were evident. Plasma cholesterol levels of rats fed soybean oil were significantly lower than those of rats fed corn oil, palm oil, palm olein or palm stearin. Significant differences between the plasma cholesterol content of rats fed corn oil and rats fed the three palm oils were not evident. HDL cholesterol was raised in rats fed the three palm oil diets compared to the rats fed either corn oil or soybean oil. The cholesterol-phospholipid molar ratio of rat platelets was not influenced by the dietary fat type. The formation of 6-keto-PGF1 alpha was significantly enhanced in palm oil-fed rats compared to all other dietary treatments. Fatty acid compositional changes in the plasma cholesterol esters and plasma triglycerides were diet regulated with significant differences between rats fed the polyunsaturated corn and soybean oil compared to the three palm oils.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  12. Ng WK, Campbell PJ, Dick JR, Bell JG
    Lipids, 2003 Oct;38(10):1031-8.
    PMID: 14669967
    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the interactive effects of dietary crude palm oil (CPO) concentration and water temperature on lipid and FA digestibility in rainbow trout. Four isolipidic diets with 0, 5, 10, or 20% (w/w) CPO, at the expense of fish oil, were formulated and fed to groups of trout maintained at water temperatures of 7, 10, or 15 degrees C. The apparent digestibility (AD) of the FA, measured using yttrium oxide as an inert marker, decreased with increasing chain length and increased with increasing unsaturation within each temperature regimen irrespective of CPO level fed to the fish. PUFA of the n-3 series were preferentially absorbed compared to n-6 PUFA in all diet and temperature treatments. Except for a few minor FA, a significant (P < 0.05) interaction between diet and temperature effects on FA digestibility was found. Increasing dietary levels of CPO lead to significant reductions in the AD of saturates and, to a lesser extent, also of the other FA. Lowering water temperature reduced total saturated FA digestibility in trout regardless of CPO level. Based on the lipid class composition of trout feces, this reduction in AD of saturates was due in part to the increasing resistance of dietary TAG to digestion. Increasing CPO level and decreasing water temperature significantly increased TAG content in trout fecal lipids, with saturates constituting more than 60% of the FA composition. Total monoene and PUFA digestibilities were not significantly affected by water temperature in fish fed up to 10% CPO in their diet. The potential impact of reduced lipid and FA digestibility in cold-water fish fed diets supplemented with high levels of CPO on fish growth performance requires further research.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  13. Rahim NS, Lim SM, Mani V, Abdul Majeed AB, Ramasamy K
    Pharm Biol, 2017 Dec;55(1):825-832.
    PMID: 28118770 DOI: 10.1080/13880209.2017.1280688
    CONTEXT: Virgin coconut oil (VCO) has been reported to possess antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-stress properties.

    OBJECTIVE: Capitalizing on these therapeutic effects, this study investigated for the first time the potential of VCO on memory improvement in vivo.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty male Wistar rats (7-8 weeks old) were randomly assigned to five groups (n = six per group). Treatment groups were administered with 1, 5 and 10 g/kg VCO for 31 days by oral gavages. The cognitive function of treated-rats were assessed using the Morris Water Maze Test. Brains were removed, homogenized and subjected to biochemical analyses of acetylcholine (ACh) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRx)], lipid peroxidase [malondialdehyde (MDA)] as well as nitric oxide (NO). α-Tocopherol (αT; 150 mg/kg) was also included for comparison purposes.

    RESULTS: VCO-fed Wistar rats exhibited significant (p  33%) and NO (≥ 34%). Overall, memory improvement by VCO was comparable to αT.

    DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: VCO has the potential to be used as a memory enhancer, the effect of which was mediated, at least in part, through enhanced cholinergic activity, increased antioxidants level and reduced oxidative stress.

    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  14. Rehman K, Aluwi MF, Rullah K, Wai LK, Mohd Amin MC, Zulfakar MH
    Int J Pharm, 2015 Jul 25;490(1-2):131-41.
    PMID: 26003416 DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2015.05.045
    Imiquimod is a chemotherapeutic agent for many skin-associated diseases, but it has also been associated with inflammatory side effects. The aim of this study was to prevent the inflammatory effect of commercial imiquimod (Aldara(®)) by controlled release of imiquimod through a hydrogel/oleogel colloidal mixture (CA bigel) containing fish oil as an anti-inflammatory agent. Imiquimod permeability from Aldara® cream and bigel through mice skin was evaluated, and the drug content residing in the skin via the tape stripping technique was quantified. The fish oil fatty acid content in skin along with its lipophilic environment was also determined. An inflammation study was conducted using animal models, and Aldara(®) cream was found to potentially cause psoriasis-like inflammation, which could be owing to prolonged application and excessive drug permeation. Controlled release of imiquimod along with fish oil through CA bigel may have caused reduced imiquimod inflammation. NMR studies and computerized molecular modeling were also conducted to observe whether the fish oil and imiquimod formed a complex that was responsible for improving imiquimod transport and reducing its side effects. NMR spectra showed dose-dependent chemical shifts and molecular modeling revealed π-σ interaction between EPA and imiquimod, which could help reduce imiquimod inflammation.
    Matched MeSH terms: Fish Oils/pharmacology*
  15. Maroufyan E, Kasim A, Ebrahimi M, Loh TC, Hair-Bejo M, Soleimani AF
    Poult Sci, 2012 Sep;91(9):2173-82.
    PMID: 22912451 DOI: 10.3382/ps.2012-02317
    This study was carried out to investigate the modulatory effects of dietary methionine and n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) ratio on immune response and performance of infectious bursal disease (IBD)-challenged broiler chickens. In total, 350 one-day-old male broiler chicks were assigned to 1 of the 6 dietary treatment groups in a 3 × 2 factorial arrangement. There were 3 n-6/n-3 PUFA ratios (45, 5.5, and 1.5) and 2 levels of methionine (NRC recommendation and twice NRC recommendation). The results showed that birds fed with dietary n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio of 5.5 had higher BW, lower feed intake, and superior FCR than other groups. However, the highest antibody response was observed in birds with dietary n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio of 1.5. Lowering n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio reduced bursa lesion score equally in birds fed with n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio of 5.5 and 1.5. Supplementation of methionine by twice the recommendation also improved FCR and reduced feed intake and bursa lesion score. However, in this study, the optimum performance (as measured by BW, feed intake, and FCR) did not coincide with the optimum immune response (as measured by antibody titer). It seems that dietary n-3 PUFA modulates the broiler chicken performance and immune response in a dose-dependent but nonlinear manner. Therefore, it can be suggested that a balance of moderate level of dietary n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio (5.5) and methionine level (twice recommendation) might enhance immune response together with performance in IBD-challenged broiler chickens.
    Matched MeSH terms: Fish Oils/pharmacology; Plant Oils/pharmacology
  16. Jayusman PA, Budin SB, Ghazali AR, Taib IS, Louis SR
    Pak J Pharm Sci, 2014 Nov;27(6):1873-80.
    PMID: 25362611
    Indiscriminate application of organophosphate (OP) pesticides has led to environmental pollution and severe health problems. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of palm oil tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) on biochemical and morphological changes of the liver in rats treated with fenitrothion (FNT), a type of OP pesticide. A total of 28 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups; control group, TRF-supplemented group, FNT-treated group and TRF+FNT group. TRF (200 mg/kg) was supplemented 30 minutes prior to FNT (20 mg/kg) administration, both orally for 28 consecutive days. Following 28 days of treatment, plasma biochemical changes and liver morphology were evaluated. The body and absolute liver weights were significantly elevated in TRF+FNT group compared to FNT group. TRF administration significantly decreased the total protein level and restored the activity of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) in TRF + FNT group. In contrast, total bilirubin level, γ-glutamyltranferase (GGT) and cholinesterase activity in TRF + FNT group did not significantly differ from FNT group. Administration of TRF also prevented FNT-induced morphological changes of liver as observed by electron microscope. In conclusion, TRF supplementation showed potential protective effect towards biochemical and ultrastructural changes in liver induced by FNT.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  17. Ali A, Wee Pheng T, Mustafa MA
    J Appl Microbiol, 2015 Jun;118(6):1456-64.
    PMID: 25727701 DOI: 10.1111/jam.12782
    To evaluate the potential use of lemongrass essential oil vapour as an alternative for synthetic fungicides in controlling anthracnose of papaya.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  18. Gopalan Y, Shuaib IL, Magosso E, Ansari MA, Abu Bakar MR, Wong JW, et al.
    Stroke, 2014 May;45(5):1422-8.
    PMID: 24699052 DOI: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.113.004449
    Previous cell-based and animal studies showed mixed tocotrienols are neuroprotective, but the effect is yet to be proven in humans. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the protective activity of mixed tocotrienols in humans with white matter lesions (WMLs). WMLs are regarded as manifestations of cerebral small vessel disease, reflecting varying degrees of neurodegeneration and tissue damage with potential as a surrogate end point in clinical trials.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology
  19. Hashim YZ, Worthington J, Allsopp P, Ternan NG, Brown EM, McCann MJ, et al.
    Food Funct, 2014 Jul 25;5(7):1513-9.
    PMID: 24836598 DOI: 10.1039/c4fo00090k
    The decreased cancer risk associated with consumption of olive oil may be due to the presence of phenolics which can modulate pathways including apoptosis and invasion that are relevant to carcinogenesis. We have previously shown that a virgin olive oil phenolics extract (OVP) inhibited invasion of HT115 colon cancer cells in vitro. In the current study we assessed the in vitro effects of OVP (25 μg mL(-1)) on HT115 cell migration, spreading and integrin expression. Furthermore, the anti-metastatic activity of OVP - at a dose equivalent to 25 mg per kg per day for 2, 8 or 10 weeks - was assessed in a Severe Combined ImmunoDeficiency (SCID) Balb-c mouse model. After 24 h OVP did not inhibit cell migration but significantly reduced cell spreading on fibronectin (65% of control; p < 0.05) and expression of a range of α and β integrins was modulated. In vivo, OVP by gavage significantly (p < 0.05) decreased not only tumour volume but also the number of metastases in SCID Balb-c mice. Collectively, the data suggest that - possibly through modulation of integrin expression - OVP decreases invasion in vitro and also inhibits metastasis in vivo.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
  20. Yap PS, Krishnan T, Yiap BC, Hu CP, Chan KG, Lim SH
    J Appl Microbiol, 2014 May;116(5):1119-28.
    PMID: 24779580 DOI: 10.1111/jam.12444
    The aim of this study was to investigate the mode of action of the lavender essential oil (LV) on antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Escherichia coli J53 R1 when used singly and in combination with piperacillin.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Oils/pharmacology*
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