Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 48 in total

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  1. Sharifi-Rad M, Varoni EM, Salehi B, Sharifi-Rad J, Matthews KR, Ayatollahi SA, et al.
    Molecules, 2017 Dec 04;22(12).
    PMID: 29207520 DOI: 10.3390/molecules22122145
    Plants of the genus Zingiber (Family Zingiberaceae) are widely used throughout the world as food and medicinal plants. They represent very popular herbal remedies in various traditional healing systems; in particular, rhizome of Zingiber spp. plants has a long history of ethnobotanical uses because of a plethora of curative properties. Antimicrobial activity of rhizome essential oil has been extensively confirmed in vitro and attributed to its chemical components, mainly consisting of monoterpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons such as α-zingiberene, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene and β-sesquiphellandrene. In addition, gingerols have been identified as the major active components in the fresh rhizome, whereas shogaols, dehydrated gingerol derivatives, are the predominant pungent constituents in dried rhizome. Zingiber spp. may thus represent a promising and innovative source of natural alternatives to chemical food preservatives. This approach would meet the increasing concern of consumers aware of the potential health risks associated with the conventional antimicrobial agents in food. This narrative review aims at providing a literature overview on Zingiber spp. plants, their cultivation, traditional uses, phytochemical constituents and biological activities.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  2. Chan EW, Wong SK
    J Integr Med, 2015 Nov;13(6):368-79.
    PMID: 26559362 DOI: 10.1016/S2095-4964(15)60208-4
    In this review, the phytochemistry and pharmacology of two ornamental gingers, Hedychium coronarium (butterfly ginger) and Alpinia purpurata (red ginger), are updated, and their botany and uses are described. Flowers of H. coronarium are large, showy, white, yellow or white with a yellow centre and highly fragrant. Inflorescences of A. purpurata are erect spikes with attractive red or pink bracts. Phytochemical investigations on the rhizomes of H. coronarium generated research interest globally. This resulted in the isolation of 53 labdane-type diterpenes, with little work done on the leaves and flowers. Pharmacological properties of H. coronarium included antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, cytotoxic, chemopreventive, anti-allergic, larvicidal, anthelminthic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-urolithiatic, anti-angiogenic, neuro-pharmacological, fibrinogenolytic, coagulant and hepatoprotective activities. On the contrary, little is known on the phytochemistry of A. purpurata with pharmacological properties of antioxidant, antibacterial, larvicidal, cytotoxic and vasodilator activities reported in the leaves and rhizomes. There is much disparity in terms of research effort within and between these two ornamental gingers.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  3. Jani NA, Sirat MH, Ali NM, Aziz A
    Nat Prod Commun, 2013 Apr;8(4):513-4.
    PMID: 23738467
    The chemical compositions of the essential oil of the rhizome, leaf and stem of Hornstedtia leonurus Retz., collected from Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia,are reported for the first time. The essential oils were extracted using hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC-FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Seventeen (96.4%), thirteen (89.2%) and nine components (98.8%) were successfully identified from the rhizome, stem and leaf oils, respectively. Phenylpropanoids were found to be the major fraction, with methyleugenol being the most abundant compound in all oils with percentage compositions of 76.4% (rhizome), 80.3% (stem) and 74.5% (leaf).
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  4. Zakaria ZA, Mohamad AS, Ahmad MS, Mokhtar AF, Israf DA, Lajis NH, et al.
    Biol Res Nurs, 2011 Oct;13(4):425-32.
    PMID: 21112917 DOI: 10.1177/1099800410386590
    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been widely used for the treatment of inflammation. However, despite their effectiveness, most NSAIDs cause various side effects that negatively affect the management of inflammation and, in part, pain. Thus, there is a need to search for new anti-inflammatory agents with few, or no, side effects. Natural products of plant, animal, or microorganism origin have been good sources of new bioactive compounds. The present study was carried out to evaluate the acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of the rhizomes of Zingiber zerumbet (Zingiberaceae) using the carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma tests, respectively. The effect of the essential oil on inflammatory- and noninflammatory-mediated pain was also assessed using the formalin test. Essential oil of Z. zerumbet, at doses of 30, 100, and 300 mg/kg, was administered intraperitoneally to rats. The substance exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity both in acute and chronic animal models. The essential oil also inhibited inflammatory- and noninflammatory-mediated pain when assessed using the formalin test. In conclusion, the essential oil of Z. zerumbet possessed anti-inflammatory activity, in addition to its antinociceptive activity, which may explain its traditional uses to treat inflammatory-related ailments.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  5. Tang SW, Sukari MA, Rahmani M, Lajis NH, Ali AM
    Molecules, 2011 Apr 07;16(4):3018-28.
    PMID: 21475124 DOI: 10.3390/molecules16043018
    A new abietene diterpene, kaempfolienol (5S,6S,7S,9S,10S,11R,13S-abiet-8(14)-enepenta-6,7,9,11,13-ol, 1), was isolated from a rhizome extract of Kaempferia angustifolia Rosc. along with the known compounds crotepoxide, boesenboxide, zeylenol, 2'-hydroxy-4,4',6'-trimethoxychalcone, (24S)-24-methyl-5α-lanosta-9(11),25-dien-3β-ol, β-sitosterol and β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside. The structures of all compounds were elucidated on the basis of mass spectroscopic and NMR data. Zeylenol (2), the major constituent of the plant, was derivatized into diacetate, triacetate and epoxide derivatives through standard organic reactions. The cytotoxic activity of compounds 1, 2 and the zeylenol derivatives was evaluated against the HL-60, MCF-7, HT-29 and HeLa cell lines.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  6. Alafiatayo AA, Syahida A, Mahmood M
    PMID: 25371557
    BACKGROUND: Natural products such as herbs, fruits, spices, beverages, vegetables are becoming more popular among scientific community and consumers because of their potential to arrest the effect of free radicals in human system. This study determined the total antioxidant capacity of ten selected species of Zingiberaceae (Ginger) used as spices and for medicinal purposes in Southeast Asia.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Methanol was used as the extraction solvent, 2,2 - diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) for free radical scavenging activity and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Phenolic compounds were measured using Total flavonoid, Phenolic acid and Polyphenols content assay to evaluate the quality of the antioxidant capacity of the rhizomes and vitamin C as positive control.

    RESULTS: The results obtained revealed that Curcuma longa and Zingiber officinale had the highest free radical scavenging capacity of 270.07mg/TE/g DW and 266.95mg/TE/g DW and FRAP assay, Curcuma longa and Zingiber officinale also gave the highest ferric reducing power of 231.73mg/TE/g DW and 176.26mg/TE/g DW respectively. For Phenolic compounds, Curcuma longa and Curcuma xanthorrhiza gave the highest values of flavonoid (741.36mg/NGN/g DW and 220.53mg/NGN/g DW), phenolic acid (42.71mg/GAE/g DW and 22.03mg/GAE/g DW) and polyphenols (39.38mg/GAE/g DW and 38.01mg/GAE/g DW) respectively. Significant and positive linear correlations were found between Total antioxidant capacity and Phenolic compounds (R = 0.65 - 0.96).

    CONCLUSION: This study provides evidence that extracts of Zingiberaceae (Ginger) rhizomes are a potential source of natural antioxidants and could serve as basis for future drugs and food supplements.

    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  7. Ghasemzadeh A, Jaafar HZ, Ashkani S, Rahmat A, Juraimi AS, Puteh A, et al.
    BMC Complement Altern Med, 2016 Mar 22;16:104.
    PMID: 27004511 DOI: 10.1186/s12906-016-1072-6
    Zingiber zerumbet (L.) is a traditional Malaysian folk remedy that contains several interesting bioactive compounds of pharmaceutical quality.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  8. Hashim SE, Sirat HM, Yen KH, Ismail IS, Matsuki SN
    Nat Prod Commun, 2015 Sep;10(9):1561-3.
    PMID: 26594759
    Seven compounds were isolated from the n-hexane and chloroform extracts of the flowers and leaves of four Hornstedtia species and their structures were identified using spectroscopic techniques as 3,7,4'-trimethylkaempferol (1), 3,7-dimethylkaempferol (2), 7,4'-dimethylkaempferol (3), 3,5-dimethylkaempferol (4), 3-methylkaempferol (5), stigmast-4-en-3-one (6), and 6-hydroxy-stigmast-4-en-3-one (7). Compounds 1 to 7 were isolated from these species for the first time. They were assayed for free radical scavenging and α-glucosidase inhibition activities. The DPPH assay showed that 3-methylkaempferol (5) was the most potent antioxidant agent with an IC50 value 78.6 µM, followed by 7,4'-dimethylkaempferol (3) (IC50 = 86.1 µM). For α-glucosidase inhibition activity, 3-methylkaempferol (5) exhibited significant inhibitory activity with an IC50 value 21.0 µM. The present study revealed that Hornstedtia species have potential activities as antioxidant and α-glucosidase inhibitors.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  9. Zulazmi NA, Gopalsamy B, Farouk AA, Sulaiman MR, Bharatham BH, Perimal EK
    Fitoterapia, 2015 Sep;105:215-21.
    PMID: 26205045 DOI: 10.1016/j.fitote.2015.07.011
    Neuropathic pain is a chronic condition that is difficult to be treated. Current therapies available are either ineffective or non-specific thus requiring newer treatment approaches. In this study, we investigated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects of zerumbone, a bioactive sesquiterpene from Zingiber zerumbet in chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain animal model. Our findings showed that single and repeated dose of intra-peritoneal administration of zerumbone (5, 10, 50, 100 mg/kg) significantly attenuated the CCI-induced neuropathic pain when evaluated using the electronic von Frey anesthesiometer, cold plate, Randall-Selitto analgesiometer and the Hargreaves plantar test. Zerumbone significantly alleviated tactile and cold allodynia as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia. Our findings are in comparison to the positive control drugs thatused gabapentin (20 mg/kgi.p.) and morphine (1 mg/kgi.p.). Together, these results showed that the systemic administration of zerumbone produced marked antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects in the CCI-induced neuropathic pain in mice and may serve as a potential lead compound for further analysis.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry
  10. Frimayanti N, Chee CF, Zain SM, Rahman NA
    Int J Mol Sci, 2011;12(2):1089-100.
    PMID: 21541045 DOI: 10.3390/ijms12021089
    Dengue is a serious disease which has become a global health burden in the last decade. Currently, there are no approved vaccines or antiviral therapies to combat the disease. The increasing spread and severity of the dengue virus infection emphasizes the importance of drug discovery strategies that could efficiently and cost-effectively identify antiviral drug leads for development into potent drugs. To this effect, several computational approaches were applied in this work. Initially molecular docking studies of reference ligands to the DEN2 NS2B/NS3 serine protease were carried out. These reference ligands consist of reported competitive inhibitors extracted from Boesenbergia rotunda (i.e., 4-hydroxypanduratin A and panduratin A) and three other synthesized panduratin A derivative compounds (i.e., 246DA, 2446DA and 20H46DA). The design of new lead inhibitors was carried out in two stages. In the first stage, the enzyme complexed to the reference ligands was minimized and their complexation energies (i.e., sum of interaction energy and binding energy) were computed. New compounds as potential dengue inhibitors were then designed by putting various substituents successively on the benzyl ring A of the reference molecule. These substituted benzyl compounds were then computed for their enzyme-ligand complexation energies. New enzyme-ligand complexes, exhibiting the lowest complexation energies and closest to the computed energy for the reference compounds, were then chosen for the next stage manipulation and design, which involved substituting positions 4 and 5 of the benzyl ring A (positions 3 and 4 for 2446DA) with various substituents.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry
  11. Kiat TS, Pippen R, Yusof R, Ibrahim H, Khalid N, Rahman NA
    Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett., 2006 Jun 15;16(12):3337-40.
    PMID: 16621533
    Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) cyclohexenyl chalcone derivatives, 4-hydroxypanduratin A and panduratin A, showed good competitive inhibitory activities towards dengue 2 virus NS3 protease with the Ki values of 21 and 25 microM, respectively, whilst those of pinostrobin and cardamonin were observed to be non-competitive. NMR and GCMS spectroscopic data formed the basis of assignment of structures of the six compounds isolated.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  12. Rahman HS, Rasedee A, Yeap SK, Othman HH, Chartrand MS, Namvar F, et al.
    Biomed Res Int, 2014;2014:920742.
    PMID: 25025076 DOI: 10.1155/2014/920742
    Zerumbone (ZER) is a naturally occurring dietary compound, present in many natural foods consumed today. The compound derived from several plant species of the Zingiberaceae family that has been found to possess multiple biomedical properties, such as antiproliferative, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer activities. However, evidence of efficacy is sparse, pointing to the need for a more systematic review for assessing scientific evidence to support therapeutic claims made for ZER and to identify future research needs. This review provides an updated overview of in vitro and in vivo investigations of ZER, its cancer chemopreventive properties, and mechanisms of action. Therapeutic effects of ZER were found to be scientifically plausible and could be explained partially by in vivo and in vitro pharmacological activities. Much of the research outlined in this paper will serve as a foundation to explain ZER anticancer bioactivity, which will open the door for the development of strategies in the treatment of malignancies using ZER.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry
  13. Ghasemzadeh A, Jaafar HZ, Rahmat A
    Molecules, 2016 Jun 17;21(6).
    PMID: 27322227 DOI: 10.3390/molecules21060780
    The effects of different drying methods (freeze drying, vacuum oven drying, and shade drying) on the phytochemical constituents associated with the antioxidant activities of Z. officinale var. rubrum Theilade were evaluated to determine the optimal drying process for these rhizomes. Total flavonoid content (TFC), total phenolic content (TPC), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity were measured using the spectrophotometric method. Individual phenolic acids and flavonoids, 6- and 8-gingerol and shogaol were identified by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography method. Ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assays were used for the evaluation of antioxidant activities. The highest reduction in moisture content was observed after freeze drying (82.97%), followed by vacuum oven drying (80.43%) and shade drying (72.65%). The highest TPC, TFC, and 6- and 8-shogaol contents were observed in samples dried by the vacuum oven drying method compared to other drying methods. The highest content of 6- and 8-gingerol was observed after freeze drying, followed by vacuum oven drying and shade drying methods. Fresh samples had the highest PPO activity and lowest content of flavonoid and phenolic acid compounds compared to dried samples. Rhizomes dried by the vacuum oven drying method represent the highest DPPH (52.9%) and FRAP activities (566.5 μM of Fe (II)/g DM), followed by freeze drying (48.3% and 527.1 μM of Fe (II)/g DM, respectively) and shade drying methods (37.64% and 471.8 μM of Fe (II)/g DM, respectively) with IC50 values of 27.2, 29.1, and 34.8 μg/mL, respectively. Negative and significant correlations were observed between PPO and antioxidant activity of rhizomes. Vacuum oven dried rhizomes can be utilized as an ingredient for the development of value-added food products as they contain high contents of phytochemicals with valuable antioxidant potential.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry
  14. Haque MA, Jantan I, Arshad L, Bukhari SNA
    Food Funct, 2017 Oct 18;8(10):3410-3431.
    PMID: 28714500 DOI: 10.1039/c7fo00595d
    Plant-derived immunomodulators and anti-cancer agents have attracted a lot of interest from natural product scientists for their efficacy and safety and their significant contribution towards understanding targeted drug action and drug delivery mechanisms. Zerumbone, the main constituent of Zingiber zerumbet rhizomes, has been investigated for its wide-spectrum role in treating multitargeted diseases. The rhizomes have been used as food flavoring agents in various cuisines and in herbal medicine. Many in vivo and in vitro studies have provided evidence of zerumbone as a potent immunomodulator as well as a potential anti-cancer agent. This review is an interesting compilation of all those significant outcomes from investigations carried out to date to explore the immunomodulatory and anticancer properties of zerumbone. The ultimate objective of this comprehensive review is to provide updated information and a critical assessment on zerumbone including its chemistry and immunomodulating and anticancer properties, which may be of paramount importance to provide a new path for ensuing research to discover new agents to treat cancers and immune-related diseases. In addition, updated information on the toxicology of zerumbone has also been summarized to provide its safety profile.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  15. Chatsumpun N, Sritularak B, Likhitwitayawuid K
    Molecules, 2017 Oct 30;22(11).
    PMID: 29084164 DOI: 10.3390/molecules22111862
    Roots of Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf. are prominent ingredients in the cuisine of several Asian countries, including Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, India, and China. An extract prepared from the roots of this plant showed strong inhibitory activity against enzymes α-glucosidase and pancreatic lipase and was subjected to chromatographic separation to identify the active components. Three new biflavonoids of the flavanone-chalcone type (9, 12, and 13) were isolated, along with 12 known compounds. Among the 15 isolates, the three new compounds showed stronger inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase than the drug acarbose but displayed lower pancreatic lipase inhibitory effect than the drug orlistat. The results indicated the potential of B. rotunda roots as a functional food for controlling after-meal blood glucose levels.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  16. Ghazalee NS, Jantan I, Arshad L, Haque MA
    Phytother Res, 2019 Apr;33(4):929-938.
    PMID: 30618097 DOI: 10.1002/ptr.6285
    Zingiber zerumbet rhizome has been used in traditional medicine mainly for the treatment of various immune-inflammatory related ailments and has been shown to exhibit a wide spectrum of biological effects especially antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the immunosuppressive effects of the standardized 80% ethanol extract of Z. zerumbet at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg on the innate immune responses in male Wistar rats. The immune parameters determined were chemotaxis of neutrophils, Mac-1 expression, engulfment of Escherichia coli by neutrophils, reactive oxygen species production, and plasma lysozyme and ceruloplasmin levels. Zerumbone was qualitatively and quantitatively determined in the extract by using a validated reversed-phase HPLC, whereas liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC -MS/MS) was used to profile the secondary metabolites. Z. zerumbet significantly inhibited the migration of neutrophils, expressions of CD11b/CD18 integrin, phagocytic activity, and production of reactive oxygen species in a dose-dependent manner. The extract also dose-dependently inhibited the expressions of lysozyme and ceruloplasmin in the rat plasma. Z. zerumbet extract possessed strong inhibitory effects on the innate immune responses and has potential to be developed into an effective immunosuppressive agent.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  17. Vairappan CS, Nagappan T, Palaniveloo K
    Nat Prod Commun, 2012 Feb;7(2):239-42.
    PMID: 22474969
    Essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the rhizomes of Etlingera pyramidosphaera (K. Schum.) R. M. Sm, E. megalocheilos (Griff.) A.D. Poulsen, comb. nov., E. coccinea (Blume) S. Sakai & Nagam, E. elatior (Jack) R. M. Sm, and E. brevilabrum (Valeton) R. M. Sm were analyzed by GCMS. The highest oil yield was obtained from E. pyramidosphaera (0.45%), followed by E. elatior (0.38%), E. coccinea (0.30%), E. brevilabrum (0.28%) and E. megalocheilos (0.25%). The major constituents of the essential oils were oxygenated monoterpenes, followed by sesquiterpenes, oxygenated sesquiterpenes, oxygenated diterpenes and diterpenes. The essential oils from E. pyramidosphaera and E. brevilabrum exhibited the best cytotoxicity against MCF 7 (LC50: 7.5 +/- 0.5 mg mL(-1)) and HL 60 (LC50: 5.0 mg mL(-1)), respectively. Strong inhibition was also observed for the essential oils of E. coccinea and E. megalocheilos against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC: 8.0 +/- 0.5 mg mL(-1), and 5.0 +/- 0.5 mg mL(-1)) and Streptococcus pyrogenes (MIC: 6.0 +/- 0.5 mg mL(-1) and 8.0 +/- 0.5 mg mL(-1)).
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  18. Sivasothy Y, Hadi AH, Mohamad K, Leong KH, Ibrahim H, Sulaiman SF, et al.
    Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett., 2012 Jun 1;22(11):3831-6.
    PMID: 22546674 DOI: 10.1016/j.bmcl.2012.02.064
    The rhizomes of Zingiber spectabile yielded a new dimeric flavonol glycoside for which the name kaempferol-3-O-(4″-O-acetyl)-α-L-rhamnopyranoside-(I-6,II-8)-kaempferol-3-O-(4″-O-acetyl)-α-L-rhamnopyranoside; spectaflavoside A (1) was proposed, along with kaempferol and its four acetylrhamnosides (2-6), demethoxycurcumin (7) and curcumin (8). The structure of spectaflavoside A was elucidated by spectroscopic methods including, 1D and 2D NMR techniques. This is the first report on the occurrence of a dimeric flavonol glycoside in the Zingiberaceae and the second in nature. Spectaflavoside A was found to be a potent iron chelating agent.
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  19. Kamazeri TS, Samah OA, Taher M, Susanti D, Qaralleh H
    Asian Pac J Trop Med, 2012 Mar;5(3):202-9.
    PMID: 22305785 DOI: 10.1016/S1995-7645(12)60025-X
    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the chemical composition of the essential oils of Curcuma aeruginosa (C. aeruginosa), Curcuma mangga (C. mangga), and Zingiber cassumunar (Z. cassumunar), and study their antimicrobial activity.

    METHODS: Essential oils obtained by steam distillation were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils was evaluated against four bacteria: Bacillus cereus (B. cereus), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Escherichia coli (E. coli), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa); and two fungi: Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Cyptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans), using disc-diffusion and broth microdilution methods.

    RESULTS: Cycloisolongifolene, 8,9-dehydro formyl (35.29%) and dihydrocostunolide (22.51%) were the major compounds in C. aeruginosa oil; whereas caryophyllene oxide (18.71%) and caryophyllene (12.69%) were the major compounds in C. mangga oil; and 2,6,9,9-tetramethyl-2,6,10-cycloundecatrien-1-one (60.77%) and α-caryophyllene (23.92%) were abundant in Z. cassumunar oil. The essential oils displayed varying degrees of antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. C. mangga oil had the highest and most broad-spectrum activity by inhibiting all microorganisms tested, with C. neoformans being the most sensitive microorganism by having the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) values of 0.1 μL/mL. C. aeruginosa oil showed mild antimicrobial activity, whereas Z. cassumunar had very low or weak activity against the tested microorganisms.

    CONCLUSIONS: The preliminary results suggest promising antimicrobial properties of C. mangga and C. aeruginosa, which may be useful for food preservation, pharmaceutical treatment and natural therapies.

    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
  20. Frimayanti N, Zain SM, Lee VS, Wahab HA, Yusof R, Abd Rahman N
    In Silico Biol. (Gedrukt), 2011;11(1-2):29-37.
    PMID: 22475750 DOI: 10.3233/ISB-2012-0442
    Publication year=2011-2012
    Matched MeSH terms: Zingiberaceae/chemistry*
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