Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 615 in total

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  1. Sabandar CW, Ahmat N, Jaafar FM, Sahidin I
    Phytochemistry, 2013 Jan;85:7-29.
    PMID: 23153517 DOI: 10.1016/j.phytochem.2012.10.009
    The genus Jatropha (Euphorbiaceae) comprises of about 170 species of woody trees, shrubs, subshrubs or herbs in the seasonally dry tropics of the Old and the New World. They are used in medicinal folklore to cure various diseases of 80% of the human population in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Species from this genus have been popular to cure stomachache, toothache, swelling, inflammation, leprosy, dysentery, dyscrasia, vertigo, anemia, diabetis, as well as to treat HIV and tumor, opthalmia, ringworm, ulcers, malaria, skin diseases, bronchitis, asthma and as an aphrodisiac. They are also employed as ornamental plants and energy crops. Cyclic peptides alkaloids, diterpenes and miscellaneous compounds have been reported from this genus. Extracts and pure compounds of plants from this genus are reported for cytotoxicity, tumor-promoting, antimicrobial, antiprotozoal, anticoagulant, immunomodulating, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, protoscolicidal, insecticidal, molluscicidal, inhibition AChE and toxicity activities.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  2. Jahurul MH, Zaidul IS, Ghafoor K, Al-Juhaimi FY, Nyam KL, Norulaini NA, et al.
    Food Chem, 2015 Sep 15;183:173-80.
    PMID: 25863626 DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2015.03.046
    The large amount of waste produced by the food industries causes serious environmental problems and also results in economic losses if not utilized effectively. Different research reports have revealed that food industry by-products can be good sources of potentially valuable bioactive compounds. As such, the mango juice industry uses only the edible portions of the mangoes, and a considerable amount of peels and seeds are discarded as industrial waste. These mango by-products come from the tropical or subtropical fruit processing industries. Mango by-products, especially seeds and peels, are considered to be cheap sources of valuable food and nutraceutical ingredients. The main uses of natural food ingredients derived from mango by-products are presented and discussed, and the mainstream sectors of application for these by-products, such as in the food, pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic industries, are highlighted.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  3. Tee LH, Yang B, Nagendra KP, Ramanan RN, Sun J, Chan ES, et al.
    Food Chem, 2014 Dec 15;165:247-55.
    PMID: 25038673 DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.05.084
    Dacryodes species are evergreen, perennial trees with fleshy fruits and belong to the family Buseraseae. Many Dacryodes species are underutilized but are widely applied in traditional folk medicine to treat malaria, fever and skin diseases. The nutritional compositions, phytochemicals and biological activities of Dacryodes edulis, Dacryodes rostrata, Dacryodes buettneri, Dacryodes klaineana and Dacryodes hexandra are presented. The edible fruits of D. edulis are rich in lipids, proteins, vitamins, fatty acids and amino acids. Its extracts (leaf, fruit and resin) exhibit antioxidant, anti-microbial, anti-carcinogenic and other bioactivities. D. rostrata fruit has significant nutrient content, and is rich in proteins, lipids and minerals. These fruits are also highly rich in polyphenols, anthocyanins and antioxidant activities. This comprehensive review will assist the reader in understanding the nutritional benefits of Dacryodes species and in identifying current research needs.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  4. Karim AA, Azlan A
    Molecules, 2012 Oct 10;17(10):11931-46.
    PMID: 23052712 DOI: 10.3390/molecules171011931
    Fruit pods contain various beneficial compounds that have biological activities and can be used as a source of pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products. Although pods or pericarps are usually discarded when consuming the edible parts of fruits, they contain some compounds that exhibit biological activities after extraction. Most fruit pods included in this review contain polyphenolic components that can promote antioxidant effects on human health. Additionally, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal and chemopreventive effects are associated with these fruit pod extracts. Besides polyphenolics, other compounds such as xanthones, carotenoids and saponins also exhibit health effects and can be potential sources of nutraceutical and pharmaceutical components. In this review, information on fruit pods or pericarp of Garcinia mangostana, Ceratonia siliqua, Moringa oleifera, Acacia nilotica, Sapindus rarak and Prosopis cineraria is presented and discussed with regard to their biological activity of the major compounds existing in them. The fruit pods of other ethno- botanical plants have also been reviewed. It can be concluded that although fruit pods are considered as being of no practical use and are often being thrown away, they nevertheless contain compounds that might be useful sources of nutraceutical and other pharmaceutical components.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  5. Ali DM, Wong KC, Lim PK
    Fitoterapia, 2005 Jan;76(1):128-30.
    PMID: 15664477
    3,4',5-Trihydroxy-3',7-dimethoxyflavanone was isolated from the ligroin extract of the leaves of Blumea balsamifera, while the acetone extract yielded 3',4',5-trihydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone and a new biflavonoid identifed as 3-O-7''-biluteolin (1). The isolation of 1 is significant since a biflavonoid with a C-O-C linkage of the type [I-3-O-II-7] has not been previously reported from a plant.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  6. Mukhtar MR, Hadi AH, Litaudon M, Awang K
    Fitoterapia, 2004 Dec;75(7-8):792-4.
    PMID: 15567268
    Five morphinoid alkaloids have been isolated from Dehaasia longipedicellata, namely (-) pallidine, a new alkaloid (+) pallidinine (1), (+)-milonine, (-) 8,14-dehydrosalutaridine and (-) sinoacutine.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  7. Husain K, Jantan I, Said IM, Aimi N, Takayama H
    J Asian Nat Prod Res, 2003 Mar;5(1):63-7.
    PMID: 12608641
    Two new indole alkaloids with the methyl chanofruticosinate skeletal system viz., methyl 3-oxo-12-methoxy-N1-decarbomethoxy-14,15-didehydrochanofruticosinate (1) and methyl 3-oxo-11,12-methylenedioxy-N-decarbomethoxy-14,15-didehydrochanofruticosinate (2), together with four known compounds, methyl 12-methoxy-N1-decarbomethoxychanofruticosinate, methyl 12-methoxychanofruticosinate, methyl 11,12-dimethoxychanofruticosinate and methyl 11,12-methylenedioxy-N1-decarbomethoxychanofruticosinate, were isolated in continuing studies on the leaves of Kopsia flavida Blume. The structures of the new indole alkaloids were assigned by NMR spectral data using various 2D-techniques.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  8. Reddy BS, Rao NR, Vijeepallam K, Pandy V
    PMID: 28480421 DOI: 10.21010/ajtcam.v14i3.11
    BACKGROUND: Tragia belongs to the family Euphorbiaceae which contains about 152 species. Interestingly, most of the earlier investigations have been done using only five Tragia species, namely, Tragia involucrata, Tragia cannabina, Tragia spathulata, Tragia plukenetii, and Tragia benthamii. The objective of the present review is to compile the phytochemical, pharmacological and biological studies of the selected five Tragia species reported in the literature.

    METHODS: The reported data/information was retrieved mainly from the online databases of PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE and Botanical Survey of India.

    RESULTS: The present review elaborated the phytochemical, pharmacological and biological properties of the selected five Tragia species obtained from recent literature.

    CONCLUSION: This review provides a basis for future investigation of Tragia species and, especially for those species that have not been explored for biological and pharmacological activities.

    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry
  9. Sawangjit R, Puttarak P, Saokaew S, Chaiyakunapruk N
    Phytother Res, 2017 Apr;31(4):555-567.
    PMID: 28165166 DOI: 10.1002/ptr.5783
    Cissus quadrangularis L. (Cissus) is a medicinal plant commonly used for centuries for various conditions, but lacks critical appraisal of its clinical effects. This study aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of Cissus in all conditions. Publications from 12 electronic databases were searched from inception through November 2016. A total of nine studies with 1108 patients were included. Each outcome was pooled using a random effects model. Effects of Cissus on hemorrhoid symptoms were not different from any comparators but had significant effects on bone pain. Effects of Cissus combination products on body weight reduction, low-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, total cholesterol, and fasting blood sugar were superior to placebo, with weighted mean difference of -5.19 kg (-8.82, -1.55), -14.43 mg/dl (-20.06, -8.80), -37.50 mg/dl (-48.71, -26.29), -50.50 mg/dl (-70.97, -30.04), and -10.39 mg/dl (-14.60, -6.18), respectively. No serious adverse effects were reported. Quality of evidence based on Grades of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation (GRADE) indicated low (bone fractures) to high quality (hemorrhoids, body weight reduction).In conclusion, Cissus had benefit for bone fractures, but not for hemorrhoids. For obesity/overweight, only combination products are pooled and show benefit. However, high-quality studies remain needed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  10. Mohamed Mahzir KA, Abd Gani SS, Hasanah Zaidan U, Halmi MIE
    Molecules, 2018 Mar 22;23(4).
    PMID: 29565312 DOI: 10.3390/molecules23040724
    In this study, the optimal conditions for the extraction of antioxidants from the Buah Mahkota Dewa fruit (Phaleria macrocarpa) was determined by using Response Surface Methodology (RSM). The optimisation was applied using a Central Composite Design (CCD) to investigate the effect of three independent variables, namely extraction temperature (°C), extraction time (minutes) and extraction solvent to-feed ratio (% v/v) on four responses: free radical scavenging activity (DPPH), ferric ion reducing power assay (FRAP), total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC). The optimal conditions for the antioxidants extraction were found to be 64 °C extraction temperature, 66 min extraction time and 75% v/v solvent to-feed ratio giving the highest percentage yields of DPPH, FRAP, TPC and TFC of 86.85%, 7.47%, 292.86 mg/g and 3.22 mg/g, respectively. Moreover, the data were subjected to Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and the results showed that the polynomial equations for all models were significant, did not show lack of fit, and presented adjusted determination coefficients (R²) above 99%, proving that the yield of phenolic, flavonoid and antioxidants activities obtained experimentally were close to the predicted values and the suitability of the model employed in RSM to optimise the extraction conditions. Hence, in this study, the fruit from P. macrocarpa could be considered to have strong antioxidant ability and can be used in various cosmeceutical or medicinal applications.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry
  11. Lim V, Schneider E, Wu H, Pang IH
    Nutrients, 2018 Oct 26;10(11).
    PMID: 30373159 DOI: 10.3390/nu10111580
    Cataract is an eye disease with clouding of the eye lens leading to disrupted vision, which often develops slowly and causes blurriness of the eyesight. Although the restoration of the vision in people with cataract is conducted through surgery, the costs and risks remain an issue. Botanical drugs have been evaluated for their potential efficacies in reducing cataract formation decades ago and major active phytoconstituents were isolated from the plant extracts. The aim of this review is to find effective phytoconstituents in cataract treatments in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. A literature search was synthesized from the databases of Pubmed, Science Direct, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and Scopus using different combinations of keywords. Selection of all manuscripts were based on inclusion and exclusion criteria together with analysis of publication year, plant species, isolated phytoconstituents, and evaluated cataract activities. Scientists have focused their attention not only for anti-cataract activity in vitro, but also in ex vivo and in vivo from the review of active phytoconstituents in medicinal plants. In our present review, we identified 58 active phytoconstituents with strong anti-cataract effects at in vitro and ex vivo with lack of in vivo studies. Considering the benefits of anti-cataract activities require critical evaluation, more in vivo and clinical trials need to be conducted to increase our understanding on the possible mechanisms of action and the therapeutic effects.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry
  12. Daud MNH, Wibowo A, Abdullah N, Ahmad R
    Food Chem, 2018 Nov 15;266:200-214.
    PMID: 30381177 DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2018.05.120
    We have previously reported on the antioxidant potential of Artocarpus heterophyllus J33 (AhJ33) variety fruit waste from different extraction methods. In the study, the rind maceration extract (RDM) exhibited the highest phenolic and polyphenolic contents and strongest antioxidant potential measured by the DPPH assay (R2 = 0.99). In this paper, we now report on the bioassay-guided fractionation of the active ethyl acetate (EtOAC) fraction of RDM and its TOF-LCMS analysis. Seven sub-fractions resulting from the chromatographic separation of the EtOAC fraction showed radical scavenging activities between 80 and 94% inhibition. Subsequent LCMS analysis led to the identification of fifteen compounds comprising 5 phenolics and 10 non-phenolic compounds, 11 of which are reported for the first time from AhJ33 variety. Most of the identified compounds have been reported to possess antioxidant activity in many previous studies. This indicates that AhJ33 is a promising source of antioxidants for the development of food and nutraceutical products.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  13. Bruguière A, Derbré S, Coste C, Le Bot M, Siegler B, Leong ST, et al.
    Fitoterapia, 2018 Nov;131:59-64.
    PMID: 30321650 DOI: 10.1016/j.fitote.2018.10.003
    Usually isolated from Garcinia (Clusiaceae) or Hypericum (Hypericaceae) species, some Polycyclic Polyprenylated AcylPhloroglucinols (PPAPs) have been recently reported as potential research tools for immunotherapy. Aiming at exploring the chemodiversity of PPAPs amongst Garcinia genus, a dereplication process suitable for such natural compounds has been developed. Although less sensitive than mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy is perfectly reproducible and allows stereoisomers distinction, justifying the development of 13C-NMR strategies. Dereplication requires the use of databases (DBs). To define if predicted DBs were accurate enough as dereplication tools, experimental and predicted δC of natural products usually isolated from Clusiaceae were compared. The ACD/Labs commercial software allowed to predict 73% of δC in a 1.25 ppm range around the experimental values. Consequently, with these parameters, the major PPAPs from a Garcinia bancana extract were successfully identified using a predicted DB.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  14. Hadi H, Razali SN, Awadh AI
    Nat Prod Commun, 2015 Aug;10(8):1483-8.
    PMID: 26434147
    Orchidaceae is the largest family of flowering plants with over 35,000 species and 850 genera. About 3300 species of orchids are found in Malaysia and the diversity is highest in the Main, Keledang, Bintang and Tahan Ranges. Apart from being prized for their beauty, orchids have long been used by humans for medicinal purposes. Today the uses of orchids have been expanded to the food and cosmetics industries. Many cosmeceutical companies use orchid extracts as an active ingredient in their products. Previous studies provide riveting insights into the potential uses of orchid extracts as an active agent in cosmetics. This paper describes the cosmeceutical potential of orchids as an anti-aging, and skin moisturizing agent. Orchid extracts from Vanda coerulea and V. teres delay aging caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) following LV irradiation through their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. These extracts also show anti-aging properties by stimulating cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV), which is part of the electron transport chain in mitochondria. Stimulation of cytochrome c oxidase improves the respiratory function of mitochondria in keratinocytes. The presence of mucilage in orchids enables them to maintain skin hydration. Mucilage functions as a moisturizer and emollient due to its high water binding capacity. Additionally, orchid extracts provide skin hydration by stimulating aquaporin 3 (AQP3) and LEKTI protein expression. The presence of AQP3 leads to a five-fold increase in water permeability, which subsequently increases stratum corneum hydration. Increased LEKTI protein expression mediated by orchid extracts reduces the degradation of desmoglein-1 and enhances the structural function of desmosomes, which play important roles in preventing water evaporation.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  15. Yang B, Prasad KN, Jiang Y
    Carbohydr Polym, 2016 Feb 10;137:570-575.
    PMID: 26686165 DOI: 10.1016/j.carbpol.2015.10.088
    As a health-beneficial fruit, litchi is widely accepted by people in subtropical and tropical regions. However, the critical chemicals responsible for the health benefits are not clear yet. As a large amount of polysaccharides are present in litchi, they might play an important role in the health benefits. In this work, the main water-soluble polysaccharide (LPPBa) was purified from litchi pulp. The chemical structure was characterized as arabinogalactan by gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). NMR data revealed the glycosidic linkages and their locations in backbone and branches. The precise structure was putatively identified as below, and it was different to those commonly occurred arabinogalactans. The molecular weight was determined to be 2.4 × 10(6)Da by gel permeation chromatography.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  16. Lee CS, Chong MF, Robinson J, Binner E
    J. Environ. Manage., 2015 Jul 1;157:320-5.
    PMID: 25929197 DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvman.2015.04.028
    The production of natural biopolymers as flocculants for water treatment is highly desirable due to their inherent low toxicity and low environmental footprint. In this study, bio-flocculants were extracted from Hibiscus/Abelmoschus esculentus (okra) by using a water extraction method, and the extract yield and its performance in sludge dewatering were evaluated. Single factor experimental design was employed to obtain the optimum conditions for extraction temperature (25-90 °C), time (0.25-5 h), solvent loading (0.5-5 w/w) and agitation speed (0-225 rpm). Results showed that extraction yield was affected non-linearly by all experimental variables, whilst the sludge dewatering ability was only influenced by the temperature of the extraction process. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained at 70 °C, 2 h, solvent loading of 2.5 w/w and agitation at 200 rpm. Under the optimal conditions, the extract yield was 2.38%, which is comparable to the extraction of other polysaccharides (0.69-3.66%). The bio-flocculants displayed >98% removal of suspended solids and 68% water recovery during sludge dewatering, and were shown to be comparable with commercial polyacrylamide flocculants. This work shows that bio-flocculants could offer a feasible alternative to synthetic flocculants for water treatment and sludge dewatering applications, and can be extracted using only water as a solvent, minimising the environmental footprint of the extraction process.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  17. Duraipandi S, Selvakumar V, Er NY
    PMID: 25885542 DOI: 10.1186/s12906-015-0568-9
    Ghritas are ayurvedic lipid based preparations in which oil or ghee is boiled with prescribed kasaya (polyherbal decoction) and kalka (fine paste of herbs) until the evaporation of aqueous phase transfers the contents into oily phase. The polyherbal decoction used in the preparation predominantly contains water soluble Active Botanical Ingredients (ABIs).
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry
  18. Chong FC, Gwee XF
    Nat. Prod. Res., 2015;29(15):1485-7.
    PMID: 25836369 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2015.1027892
    The ultrasonic extraction (UE) method of anthocyanin from Clitoria ternatea flowers using response surface methodology (RSM) was performed in this study. By using RSM, the objective is to optimise the extraction yield of anthocyanin from C. ternatea which is influenced by various factors, including the extraction temperature, time, ratio of solvent to solid and ultrasonic power. The empirical model was investigated by performing first-level optimisation in a two-level factorial design with Design Expert 7 software. In comparison with the conventional solvent extraction, UE showed a 246.48% better extraction yield and produced an anthocyanin extract with a radical scavenging activity of 68.48% at the optimised factors of 50°C, 150 min, 15 mL/g and 240 W.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
  19. Amirul Alam M, Juraimi AS, Rafii MY, Hamid AA, Aslani F, Alam MZ
    Food Chem, 2015 Feb 15;169:439-47.
    PMID: 25236249 DOI: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.08.019
    Dry matter (DM), total phenolics, flavonoids, carotenoid contents, and antioxidant activity of 12 purslane accessions were investigated against five levels of salinity (0, 8, 16, 24 and 32dSm(-1)). In untreated plants, the DM contents ranged between 8.0-23.4g/pot; total phenolics contents (TPC) between 0.96-9.12mgGAEg(-1)DW; total flavonoid contents (TFC) between 0.15-1.44mgREg(-1)DW; and total carotenoid contents (TCC) between 0.52BCEg(-1)DW. While FRAP activity ranged from 8.64-104.21mgTEg(-1)DW (about 12-fold) and DPPH activity between 2.50-3.30mgmL(-1) IC50 value. Different levels of salinity treatment resulted in 8-35% increases in TPC; about 35% increase in TFC; and 18-35% increases in FRAP activity. Purslane accessions Ac4, Ac5, Ac6 and Ac8 possessed potentials for salinity-induced augmented production of bioactive compounds which in turn can be harnessed for possible human health benefits.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry
  20. Ghasemzadeh A, Jaafar HZ
    ScientificWorldJournal, 2014;2014:523120.
    PMID: 25147852 DOI: 10.1155/2014/523120
    Response surface methodology was applied to optimization of the conditions for reflux extraction of Pandan (Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb.) in order to achieve a high content of total flavonoids (TF), total phenolics (TP), and high antioxidant capacity (AC) in the extracts. Central composite experimental design with three factors and three levels was employed to consider the effects of the operation parameters, including the methanol concentration (MC, 40%-80%), extraction temperature (ET, 40-70°C), and liquid-to-solid ratio (LS ratio, 20-40 mL/g) on the properties of the extracts. Response surface plots showed that increasing these operation parameters induced the responses significantly. The TF content and AC could be maximized when the extraction conditions (MC, ET, and LS ratio) were 78.8%, 69.5°C, and 32.4 mL/g, respectively, whereas the TP content was optimal when these variables were 75.1%, 70°C, and 31.8 mL/g, respectively. Under these optimum conditions, the experimental TF and TP content and AC were 1.78, 6.601 mg/g DW, and 87.38%, respectively. The optimized model was validated by a comparison of the predicted and experimental values. The experimental values were found to be in agreement with the predicted values, indicating the suitability of the model for optimizing the conditions for the reflux extraction of Pandan.
    Matched MeSH terms: Plant Extracts/chemistry*
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