Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 254 in total

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  1. Abas F, Lajis NH, Shaari K, Israf DA, Stanslas J, Yusuf UK, et al.
    J Nat Prod, 2005 Jul;68(7):1090-3.
    PMID: 16038556
    A new labdane diterpene glucoside, curcumanggoside (1), together with nine known compounds, including labda-8(17),12-diene-15,16-dial (2), calcaratarin A (3), zerumin B (4), scopoletin, demethoxycurcumin, bisdemethoxycurcumin, 1,7-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1,4,6-heptatrien-3-one, curcumin, and p-hydroxycinnamic acid, have been isolated from the rhizomes of Curcuma mangga. Their structures were determined using a combination of 1D (1H NMR, 13C NMR, DEPT) and 2D (COSY, HSQC, HMBC) NMR techniques. All diarylheptanoids and scopoletin showed significant antioxidant activity. Zerumin B, demethoxycurcumin, bisdemethoxycurcumin, and curcumin also exhibited cytotoxic activity against a panel of five human tumor cell lines.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  2. Abdullah AS, Mohammed AS, Rasedee A, Mirghani ME
    Int J Mol Sci, 2015;16(2):3528-36.
    PMID: 25664859 DOI: 10.3390/ijms16023528
    Breast cancer has become a global health issue requiring huge expenditures for care and treatment of patients. There is a need to discover newer cost-effective alternatives for current therapeutic regimes. Mango kernel is a waste product with potential as a source of anti-cancer phytochemicals, especially since it is non-toxic towards normal breast cell lines at concentrations for which it induces cell death in breast cancer cells. In this study, the anti-cancer effect of mango kernel extract was determined on estrogen receptor-positive human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) cells. The MCF-7 cells were cultured and treated with 5, 10 and 50 μg/mL of mango kernel extract for 12 and 24 h. In response to treatment, there were time- and dose-dependent increases in oxidative stress markers and pro-apoptotic factors; Bcl-2-like protein 4 (BAX), p53, cytochrome c and caspases (7, 8 and 9) in the MCF-7 cells treated with the extract. At the same time, there were decreases in pro-survival markers (Bcl-2 and glutathione) as the result of the treatments. The changes induced in the MCF-7 cells by mango kernel extract treatment suggest that the extract can induce cancer cell apoptosis, likely via the activation of oxidative stress. These findings need to be evaluated further to determine whether mango kernel extract can be developed as an anti-breast cancer agent.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  3. Abdullah AS, Mohammed AS, Rasedee A, Mirghani ME, Al-Qubaisi MS
    PMID: 25881293 DOI: 10.1186/s12906-015-0575-x
    In this study, the effect of mango kernel extract in the induction of apoptosis of the breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cell line was examined. This is an attempt to discover alternatives to current therapeutic regimes in the treatment of breast cancers.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  4. Abdullah N, Sahibul-Anwar H, Ideris S, Hasuda T, Hitotsuyanagi Y, Takeya K, et al.
    Fitoterapia, 2013 Jul;88:1-6.
    PMID: 23570840 DOI: 10.1016/j.fitote.2013.03.028
    Goniothalamus macrophyllus (Blume) Hook. f. & Thoms. is a plant widely distributed in Malaysia. The aim of this study is to identify compounds from the roots of G. macrophyllus. The ground roots were extracted with aqueous methanol and partitioned sequentially with n-hexane, chloroform and butanol. Purification from this extracts afforded six compounds with two new compounds, namely goniolandrene-A (1), -B (2). The absolute configuration of goniolandrene B (2) was established by circular dichrosim. The compounds were cytotoxic against the P388 cells with IC50 values ranging from 0.42 to 160 μM. Goniothalamin (3) exhibited the highest inhibition of 0.42 μM.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  5. Abu Bakar A, Akhtar MN, Mohd Ali N, Yeap SK, Quah CK, Loh WS, et al.
    Molecules, 2018 Mar 08;23(3).
    PMID: 29518053 DOI: 10.3390/molecules23030616
    Flavokawain B (1) is a natural chalcone extracted from the roots of Piper methysticum, and has been proven to be a potential cytotoxic compound. Using the partial structure of flavokawain B (FKB), about 23 analogs have been synthesized. Among them, compounds 8, 13 and 23 were found in new FKB derivatives. All compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic properties against two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, thus establishing the structure-activity relationship. The FKB derivatives 16 (IC50 = 6.50 ± 0.40 and 4.12 ± 0.20 μg/mL), 15 (IC50 = 5.50 ± 0.35 and 6.50 ± 1.40 μg/mL) and 13 (IC50 = 7.12 ± 0.80 and 4.04 ± 0.30 μg/mL) exhibited potential cytotoxic effects on the MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. However, the methoxy group substituted in position three and four in compound 2 (IC50 = 8.90 ± 0.60 and 6.80 ± 0.35 μg/mL) and 22 (IC50 = 8.80 ± 0.35 and 14.16 ± 1.10 μg/mL) exhibited good cytotoxicity. The lead compound FKB (1) showed potential cytotoxicity (IC50 = 7.70 ± 0.30 and 5.90 ± 0.30 μg/mL) against two proposed breast cancer cell lines. It is evident that the FKB skeleton is unique for anticancer agents, additionally, the presence of halogens (Cl and F) in position 2 and 3 also improved the cytotoxicity in FKB series. These findings could help to improve the future drug discovery process to treat breast cancer. A molecular dynamics study of active compounds revealed stable interactions within the active site of Janus kinase. The structures of all compounds were determined by ¹H-NMR, EI-MS, IR and UV and X-ray crystallographic spectroscopy techniques.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  6. Abubakar IB, Lim KH, Loh HS
    Nat Prod Res, 2015;29(22):2137-40.
    PMID: 25515603 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2014.991927
    Tocotrienols have been reported to possess anticancer effects other than anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. This study explored the potential synergism of antiproliferative effects induced by individual alkaloid extracts of Ficus fistulosa, Ficus hispida and Ficus schwarzii combined with δ- and γ-tocotrienols against human brain glioblastoma (U87MG), lung adenocarcinoma (A549) and colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells. Cell viability and morphological results demonstrated that extracts containing a mixture of alkaloids from the leaves and bark of F. schwarzii inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells, whereas the alkaloid extracts of F. fistulosa inhibited the proliferation of both U87MG and HT-29 cells and showed synergism in combined treatments with either δ- or γ-tocotrienol resulting in 2.2-34.7 fold of reduction in IC50 values of tocotrienols. The observed apoptotic cell characteristics in conjunction with the synergistic antiproliferative effects of Ficus species-derived alkaloids and tocotrienols assuredly warrant future investigations towards the development of a value-added chemotherapeutic regimen against cancers.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  7. Abubakar IB, Lim KH, Kam TS, Loh HS
    Phytomedicine, 2017 Jul 01;30:74-84.
    PMID: 28545672 DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2017.03.004
    BACKGROUND: γ-Tocotrienol, a vitamin E isomer possesses pronounced in vitro anticancer activities. However, the in vivo potency has been limited by hardly achievable therapeutic levels owing to inefficient high-dose oral delivery which leads to subsequent metabolic degradation. Jerantinine A, an Aspidosperma alkaloid, originally isolated from Tabernaemontana corymbosa, has proved to possess interesting anticancer activities. However, jerantinine A also induces toxicity to non-cancerous cells.

    PURPOSE: We adopted a combinatorial approach with the joint application of γ-tocotrienol and jerantinine A at lower concentrations in order to minimize toxicity towards non-cancerous cells while improving the potency on brain cancer cells.

    METHODS: The antiproliferative potency of individual γ-tocotrienol and jerantinine A as well as combined in low-concentration was firstly evaluated on U87MG cancer and MRC5 normal cells. Morphological changes, DNA damage patterns, cell cycle arrests and the effects of individual and combined low-concentration compounds on microtubules were then investigated. Finally, the potential roles of caspase enzymes and apoptosis-related proteins in mediating the apoptotic mechanisms were investigated using apoptosis antibody array, ELISA and Western blotting analysis.

    RESULTS: Combinatorial study between γ-tocotrienol at a concentration range (0-24µg/ml) and fixed IC20 concentration of jerantinine A (0.16µg/ml) induced a potent antiproliferative effect on U87MG cells and led to a reduction on the new half maximal inhibitory concentration of γ-tocotrienol (i.e.tIC50=1.29µg/ml) as compared to that of individual γ-tocotrienol (i.e. IC50=3.17µg/ml). A reduction on undesirable toxicity to MRC5 normal cells was also observed. G0/G1 cell cycle arrest was evident on U87MG cells receiving IC50 of individual γ-tocotrienol and combined low-concentration compounds (1.29µg/ml γ-tocotrienol + 0.16µg/ml jerantinine A), whereas, a profound G2/M arrest was evident on cells treated with IC50 of individual jerantinine A. Additionally, individual jerantinine A and combined compounds (except individual γ-tocotrienol) caused a disruption of microtubule networks triggering Fas- and p53-induced apoptosis mediated via the death receptor and mitochondrial pathways.

    CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrated that the combined use of lower concentrations of γ-tocotrienol and jerantinine A induced potent cytotoxic effects on U87MG cancer cells resulting in a reduction on the required individual concentrations and thereby minimizing toxicity of jerantinine A towards non-cancerous MRC5 cells as well as probably overcoming the high-dose limiting application of γ-tocotrienol. The multi-targeted mechanisms of action of the combination approach have shown a therapeutic potential against brain cancer in vitro and therefore, further in vivo investigations using a suitable animal model should be the way forward.

    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  8. Abubakar IB, Loh HS
    J Pharm Pharmacol, 2016 Apr;68(4):423-32.
    PMID: 26887962 DOI: 10.1111/jphp.12523
    OBJECTIVES: Tabernaemontana is a genus from the plant family, Apocynaceae with vast medicinal application and widespread distribution in the tropics and subtropics of Africa, Americas and Asia. The objective of this study is to critically evaluate the ethnobotany, medicinal uses, pharmacology and phytochemistry of the species, Tabernaemontana corymbosa (Roxb. ex Wall.) and provide information on the potential future application of alkaloids isolated from different parts of the plant.

    KEY FINDINGS: T. corymbosa (Roxb. ex Wall.) parts are used as poultice, boiled juice, decoctions and infusions for treatment against ulceration, fracture, post-natal recovery, syphilis, fever, tumours and orchitis in Malaysia, China, Thailand and Bangladesh. Studies recorded alkaloids as the predominant phytochemicals in addition to phenols, saponins and sterols with vast bioactivities such as antimicrobial, analgesic, anthelmintic, vasorelaxation, antiviral and cytotoxicity.

    SUMMARY: An evaluation of scientific data and traditional medicine revealed the medicinal uses of different parts of T. corymbosa (Roxb. ex Wall.) across Asia. Future studies exploring the structure-bioactivity relationship of alkaloids such as jerantinine and vincamajicine among others could potentially improve the future application towards reversing anticancer drug resistance.

    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  9. Adebayo IA, Arsad H, Samian MR
    PMID: 28573245 DOI: 10.21010/ajtcam.v14i2.30
    BACKGROUND: Moringa oleifera belongs to plant family, Moringaceae and popularly called "wonderful tree", for it is used traditionally to cure many diseases including cancer in Africa and Asia, however, there is limited knowledge on cytotoxic activity of Moringa oleifera seeds on MCF7 breast cancer cell. The present study evaluated antiproliferative effect on MCF7 of the seed.
    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Seeds of Moringa oleifera were grinded to powder and its phytochemicals were extracted using water and 80% ethanol solvents, part of the ethanolic extract were sequentially partitioned to fractions with four solvents (hexane, dichloromethane, chloroform, and n-butanol). Antiproliferative effects on MCF7 of the samples were determined. Finally, potent samples that significantly inhibited MCF7 growth were tested on MCF 10A.
    RESULTS: Crude water extract, hexane and dichloromethane fractions of the seeds inhibited the proliferation of MCF7 with the following IC50 values 280 μg/ml, 130 μg/ml and 26 μg/ml respectively, however, of the 3 samples, only hexane fraction had minimal cytotoxic effect on MCF 10A (IC50 > 400μg/ml).
    CONCLUSION: Moringa oleifera seed has antiproliferative effect on MCF7.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  10. Ahmad S, Sukari MA, Ismail N, Ismail IS, Abdul AB, Abu Bakar MF, et al.
    PMID: 25887035 DOI: 10.1186/s12906-015-0594-7
    Mangifera pajang Kosterm is a plant species from the mango family (Anacardiaceae). The fruits are edible and have been reported to have high antioxidant content. However, the detailed phytochemical studies of the plant have not been reported previously. This study investigates the phytochemicals and biological activities of different parts of Mangifera pajang.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  11. Ahmat N, Wibowo A, Mohamad SA, Low AL, Sufian AS, Yusof MI, et al.
    J Asian Nat Prod Res, 2014;16(11):1099-107.
    PMID: 25034352 DOI: 10.1080/10286020.2014.938059
    A new tetramer oligostilbenoid possessing tetrahydrofuran ring, malaysianol C (1), was isolated from the acetone extract of the stem bark of Dryobalanops lanceolata, together with four known oligostilbenoids nepalensinol E (2), ϵ-viniferin (3), laevifonol (4), and ampelopsin F (5). The structures of isolated compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectral evidence. The antibacterial activity of the isolated compounds was evaluated using resazurin microtitre-plate assay, whereas the cytotoxic activity was tested using MTT assay. The plausible biogenetic routes of the isolated compounds are also discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  12. Ahmed Hassan LE, Khadeer Ahamed MB, Abdul Majid AS, Iqbal MA, Al Suede FS, Haque RA, et al.
    PLoS One, 2014;9(6):e90806.
    PMID: 24608571 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090806
    Tephrosia apollinea is a perennial shrublet widely distributed in Africa and is known to have medicinal properties. The current study describes the bio-assay (cytotoxicity) guided isolation of (-)-pseudosemiglabrin from the aerial parts of T. apollinea. The structural and stereochemical features have been described using spectral and x-ray crystallographic techniques. The cytotoxicity of isolated compound was evaluated against nine cancer cell lines. In addition, human fibroblast was used as a model cell line for normal cells. The results showed that (-)-pseudosemiglabrin exhibited dose-dependent antiproliferative effect on most of the tested cancer cell lines. Selectively, the compound showed significant inhibitory effect on the proliferation of leukemia, prostate and breast cancer cell lines. Further studies revealed that, the compound exhibited proapoptotic phenomenon of cytotoxicity. Interestingly, the compound did not display toxicity against the normal human fibroblast. It can be concluded that (-)-pseudosemiglabrin is worthy for further investigation as a potential chemotherapeutic agent.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  13. Al Muqarrabun LM, Ahmat N
    Eur J Med Chem, 2015 Mar 6;92:514-30.
    PMID: 25599949 DOI: 10.1016/j.ejmech.2015.01.026
    The family Sterculiaceae is one of the most important families among flowering plants. Many of its members demonstrate medicinal properties and have been used for the treatment of various ailments and wounds. A wide range of compounds including alkaloids, phenyl propanoids, flavonoids, terpenoids and other types of compounds including hydrocarbons, sugars, quinones, phenolic acids, lactones, lignans, amine and amides have been isolated from several species in this family. Few studies have reported that some extracts and single compounds isolated from this family exhibited several biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities. The present review is an effort to provide information about the traditional uses, phytochemistry and pharmacology of species from family Sterculiaceae, and to uncover the gaps and potentials requiring further research opportunities regarding the chemistry and pharmacy of this family.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  14. Al Muqarrabun LM, Ahmat N, Aris SR, Norizan N, Shamsulrijal N, Yusof FZ, et al.
    Nat Prod Res, 2014;28(13):1003-9.
    PMID: 24697194 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2014.903396
    A new triterpene, malaytaraxerate (1), and four known compounds, taraxerol (2), taraxerone (3), docosyl isoferulate (4) and docosanoic acid 2',3'-dihydroxypropyl ester (5), were isolated from the acetone extract of Sapium baccatum stem bark. The structures of the isolated compounds were determined using several spectroscopic methods, including UV-Vis, FT-IR, 1D and 2D NMR, and mass spectrometry. Major isolated compounds were assayed for cytotoxicity. The chemotaxonomic significance of this plant was also studied.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  15. Al Muqarrabun LM, Ahmat N, Aris SR, Shamsulrijal N, Baharum SN, Ahmad R, et al.
    Nat Prod Res, 2014;28(9):597-605.
    PMID: 24568340 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2014.886211
    A new sesquiterpenoid, malayscaphiol (1), and three known compounds, lupeol (2), lupenone (3) and stigmasterol (4), were isolated from the methanolic extract of the stem bark of Scaphium macropodum. The structures of the isolated compounds were determined using several spectroscopic methods, including UV-vis, FT-IR, 1D and 2D NMR, and mass spectrometer. Major isolated compounds were assayed for cytotoxicity and anti-acetylcholinesterase activities. The chemotaxonomy significance of this plant was also discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  16. Al-Khdhairawi AAQ, Krishnan P, Mai CW, Chung FF, Leong CO, Yong KT, et al.
    J Nat Prod, 2017 10 27;80(10):2734-2740.
    PMID: 28926237 DOI: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.7b00500
    Tengerensine (1), isolated as a racemate and constituted from a pair of bis-benzopyrroloisoquinoline enantiomers, and tengechlorenine (2), purified as a scalemic mixture and constituted from a pair of chlorinated phenanthroindolizidine enantiomers, were isolated from the leaves of Ficus fistulosa var. tengerensis, along with three other known alkaloids. The structures of 1 and 2 were determined by spectroscopic data interpretation and X-ray diffraction analysis. The enantiomers of 1 were separated by chiral-phase HPLC, and the absolute configurations of (+)-1 and (-)-1 were established via experimental and calculated ECD data. Compound 1 is notable in being a rare unsymmetrical cyclobutane adduct and is the first example of a dimeric benzopyrroloisoquinoline alkaloid, while compound 2 represents the first naturally occurring halogenated phenanthroindolizidine alkaloid. Compound (+)-1 displayed a selective in vitro cytotoxic effect against MDA-MB-468 cells (IC50 7.4 μM), while compound 2 showed pronounced in vitro cytotoxic activity against all three breast cancer cell lines tested (MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231, and MCF7; IC50 values of 0.038-0.91 μM).
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  17. Al-Mekhlafi NA, Shaaria K, Abas F, Jeyaraj EJ, Stanslas J, Khalivulla SI, et al.
    Nat Prod Commun, 2013 Apr;8(4):447-51.
    PMID: 23738449
    In the present study phytochemical investigation of the methanol extract of the stem bark of Horsfieldia superba led to the isolation of twenty compounds (1-20), of which three (1-3) were new. However, compounds 2 and 3 were previously reported as synthetic alpha,beta-lactones. The compounds were characterized as (-)-3,4',7-trihydroxy-3'-methoxyflavan (1), (-)-5,6-dihydro-6-undecyl-2H-pyran-2-one (2), and (-)-5,6-dihydro-6-tridecyl-2H-pyran-2-one (3). Seventeen other known compounds were also isolated and identified as (-)-viridiflorol (4), hexacosanoic acid (5), beta-sitosterol (6), methyl 2,4-dihydroxy-6-methylbenzoate (methylorsellinate) (7), methyl 2,4-dihydroxy-3,6-dimethylbenzoate (8), (-)-4'-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavan (9), (-)-4',7-dihydroxyflavan (10), (-)-4',7-dihydroxy-3'-methoxyflavan (11), (+)-3,4',7-trihydroxyflavan (12), (-)-catechin (13), (-)-epicatechin (14), (-)-7-hydroxy-3',4'-methylenedioxyflavan (15), 2',3,4-trihydroxy-4'-methoxydihydrochalcone (16), 3',4',7-trihydroxyflavone (17), (+)-4'-hydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (18), hexadecanoic acid (palmitic acid) (19) and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (20). The structures of the compounds were fully characterized by various physical methods (melting point, optical rotation), spectral (UV, IR, ID and 2D NMR) and mass spectrometric techniques. In vitro assay of compounds 2 and 3 demonstrated moderate cytotoxic activities against human prostate (PC-3), colon (HCT-116) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells, while the chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions of H. superba were found to exhibit moderate AChE inhibitory activity (IC50 72 and 60 microg/mL).
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology
  18. Al-Salahi OS, Ji D, Majid AM, Kit-Lam C, Abdullah WZ, Zaki A, et al.
    PLoS One, 2014;9(1):e83818.
    PMID: 24409284 DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0083818
    Eurycoma longifolia Jack has been widely used in traditional medicine for its antimalarial, aphrodisiac, anti-diabetic, antimicrobial and anti-pyretic activities. Its anticancer activity has also been recently reported on different solid tumors, however no anti-leukemic activity of this plant has been reported. Thus the present study assesses the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative and apoptotic potentials of E. longifolia on K-562 leukemic cell line. The K-562 cells (purchased from ATCC) were isolated from patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) were treated with the various fractions (TAF273, F3 and F4) of E. longifolia root methanolic extract at various concentrations and time intervals and the anti-proliferative activity assessed by MTS assay. Flow cytometry was used to assess the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Nude mice injected subcutaneously with 10(7) K-562 cells were used to study the anti-leukemic activity of TAF273 in vivo. TAF273, F3 and F4 showed various degrees of growth inhibition with IC50 values of 19, 55 and 62 µg/ml, respectively. TAF273 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner. TAF273 arrested cell cycle at G1 and S phases. Intraperitoneal administration of TAF273 (50 mg/kg) resulted in a significant growth inhibition of subcutaneous tumor in TAF273-treated mice compared with the control mice (P = 0.024). TAF273 shows potent anti-proliferative activity in vitro and in vivo models of CML and therefore, justifies further efforts to define more clearly the potential benefits of using TAF273 as a novel therapeutic strategy for CML management.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  19. Alhuthali HM, Bradshaw TD, Lim KH, Kam TS, Seedhouse CH
    BMC Cancer, 2020 Jul 07;20(1):629.
    PMID: 32635894 DOI: 10.1186/s12885-020-07119-2
    BACKGROUND: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogenous hematological malignancy with poor long-term survival. New drugs which improve the outcome of AML patients are urgently required. In this work, the activity and mechanism of action of the cytotoxic indole alkaloid Jerantinine B (JB), was examined in AML cells.

    METHODS: We used a combination of proliferation and apoptosis assays to assess the effect of JB on AML cell lines and patient samples, with BH3 profiling being performed to identify early effects of the drug (4 h). Phosphokinase arrays were adopted to identify potential driver proteins in the cellular response to JB, the results of which were confirmed and extended using western blotting and inhibitor assays and measuring levels of reactive oxygen species.

    RESULTS: AML cell growth was significantly impaired following JB exposure in a dose-dependent manner; potent colony inhibition of primary patient cells was also observed. An apoptotic mode of death was demonstrated using Annexin V and upregulation of apoptotic biomarkers (active caspase 3 and cleaved PARP). Using BH3 profiling, JB was shown to prime cells to apoptosis at an early time point (4 h) and phospho-kinase arrays demonstrated this to be associated with a strong upregulation and activation of both total and phosphorylated c-Jun (S63). The mechanism of c-Jun activation was probed and significant induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was demonstrated which resulted in an increase in the DNA damage response marker γH2AX. This was further verified by the loss of JB-induced C-Jun activation and maintenance of cell viability when using the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC).

    CONCLUSIONS: This work provides the first evidence of cytotoxicity of JB against AML cells and identifies ROS-induced c-Jun activation as the major mechanism of action.

    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  20. Ali AM, Mackeen MM, Hamid M, Aun QB, Zauyah Y, Azimahtol HL, et al.
    Planta Med, 1997 Feb;63(1):81-3.
    PMID: 9063100
    The cytotoxicity of goniothalamin was found to be strong towards both cancerous (HGC-27, MCF-7, PANC-1, HeLa), and non-cancerous (3T3) cell lines, especially in cases of dividing cells. Drug exposure studies indicated that the cytotoxic action of goniothalamin was time- and dose-dependent. At the ultrastructural level, goniothalamin-induced cytotoxicity revealed a necrotic mode of cell death towards MCF-7 cells.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
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