Displaying publications 1 - 20 of 300 in total

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  1. Neoh CK
    Med J Malaysia, 1992 Mar;47(1):86-8.
    PMID: 1387458
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  2. Talei D, Valdiani A, Puad MA
    Biotechnol Appl Biochem, 2013 Sep-Oct;60(5):521-6.
    PMID: 23725097 DOI: 10.1002/bab.1126
    Proteomic analysis of plants relies on high yields of pure protein. In plants, protein extraction and purification present a great challenge due to accumulation of a large amount of interfering substances, including polysaccharides, polyphenols, and secondary metabolites. Therefore, it is necessary to modify the extraction protocols. A study was conducted to compare four protein extraction and precipitation methods for proteomic analysis. The results showed significant differences in protein content among the four methods. The chloroform-trichloroacetic acid-acetone method using 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer provided the best results in terms of protein content, pellets, spot resolution, and intensity of unique spots detected. An overall of 83 qualitative or quantitative significant differential spots were found among the four methods. Based on the 2-DE gel map, the method is expected to benefit the development of high-level proteomic and biochemical studies of Andrographis paniculata, which may also be applied to other recalcitrant medicinal plant tissues.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
  3. Aspollah Sukari M, Wah TS, Saad SM, Rashid NY, Rahmani M, Lajis NH, et al.
    Nat Prod Res, 2010 May;24(9):838-45.
    PMID: 20461629 DOI: 10.1080/14786410903052951
    Curcuma ochrorhiza ('temu putih') and C. heyneana ('temu giring') are two Zingiberaceous species which are commonly used in traditional medicine in Malaysia and Indonesia. Phytochemical investigations on these Curcuma species have resulted in the isolation of six sesquiterpenes, namely zerumbone (1), furanodienone (2), zederone (3), oxycurcumenol epoxide (4), curcumenol (5) and isocurcumenol (6), along with phytosterols stigmasterol and alpha-sitosterol. Compounds 1 and 2 were obtained for the first time for C. ochrorhiza while 4 was new to C. heyneana. The hexane extract of C. ochrorhiza and sesquiterpenes 1 and 3 showed very strong cytotoxicity activity against T-acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells (CEM-SS), with IC(50) values of 6.0, 0.6 and 1.6 microg mL(-1), respectively. Meanwhile, constituents from C. heyneana (4-6) demonstrated moderate inhibition against CEM-SS in cytotoxic assay, with IC(50) values of 11.9, 12.6 and 13.3 microg mL(-1), respectively. The crude extracts and sesquiterpenes isolated were moderately active against certain bacteria tested in antimicrobial screening.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry*
  4. Awang K, Hadi AH, Saidi N, Mukhtar MR, Morita H, Litaudon M
    Fitoterapia, 2008 Jun;79(4):308-10.
    PMID: 18313862 DOI: 10.1016/j.fitote.2007.11.025
    The bark of Cryptocarya crassinervia provided two new phenantrene alkaloids, 2-hydroxyatherosperminine (1) and N-demethyl-2-methoxyatherosperminine (2).
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
  5. Komala I, Rahmani M, Sukari MA, Mohd Ismail HB, Cheng Lian GE, Rahmat A
    Nat Prod Res, 2006 Apr;20(4):355-60.
    PMID: 16644530
    Investigation on the leaves of Melicope bonwickii (F.Muell.) T.Hartley (Rutaceae) afforded a new 7-(2'-hydroxy-3'-chloroprenyloxy)-4-methoxyfuroquinoline (1) together with the known 7-(2',3'-epoxyprenyloxy)-4-methoxyfuroquinoline (2), evellerine (3) kokusaginine (4) and an amide aurantiamide acetate (5). Compounds 1 and 2 showed significant activity against cervical cell lines (Hela).
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
  6. Seyed MA, Jantan I, Bukhari SN, Vijayaraghavan K
    J Agric Food Chem, 2016 Feb 3;64(4):725-37.
    PMID: 26758628 DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.5b05993
    Cancer is a diverse class of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell growth that constitutes the greatest cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Despite steady progress, the treatment modalities of cancer are still insufficient. Several new concepts have emerged for therapeutic intervention in malignant diseases with the goal of identifying specific targets and overcoming resistance against current cytotoxic therapies. Many studies have reported the remarkable and significant properties of dietary plant polyphenols such as curcumin, resveratrol, flavopiridol, indirubin, magnolol, piceatannol, parthenolide, epigallocatechin gallate, and cucurbitacin as anticancer agents known for their pleiotropic effects on cancer, immune cells, and inflammation. Piceatannol, an analogue and metabolite of resveratrol, is a natural stilbene commonly found in grape skins and wine. Compared to resveratrol, this molecule exhibits superior bioactivities as an inhibitor of COX-1/2 and the CSN-associated kinase. Piceatannol is thought to be a potent natural compound with many therapeutic effects, such as the prevention of hypercholesterolemia, arrhythmia, atherosclerosis, angiogenesis, and cardiovascular diseases. It also demonstrates vasorelaxation, antioxidant, and anticancer activities. This comprehensive review summarizes the current data regarding the mechanisms of action of piceatannol, its chemopreventive properties, and its possible therapeutic potential against various types of human cancer.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/metabolism; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
  7. Xu YJ, Chiang PY, Lai YH, Vittal JJ, Wu XH, Tan BK, et al.
    J Nat Prod, 2000 Oct;63(10):1361-3.
    PMID: 11076552
    Leaf extracts of Garcinia parvifolia provided relatively high yields of four novel, cytotoxic prenylated depsidones. The structures were determined mainly by detailed NMR spectral analysis and X-ray crystallography.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
  8. Bihud NV, Rasol NE, Imran S, Awang K, Ahmad FB, Mai CW, et al.
    J Nat Prod, 2019 09 27;82(9):2430-2442.
    PMID: 31433181 DOI: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.8b01067
    Eight new bis-styryllactones, goniolanceolatins A-H (1-8), possessing a rare α,β-unsaturated δ-lactone moiety with a (6S)-configuration, were isolated from the CH2Cl2 extract of the stembark and roots of Goniothalamus lanceolatus Miq., a plant endemic to Malaysia. Absolute structures were established through extensive 1D- and 2D-NMR data analysis, in combination with electronic dichroism (ECD) data. All of the isolates were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against human lung and colorectal cancer cell lines. Compounds 2 and 4 showed cytotoxicity, with IC50 values ranging from 2.3 to 4.2 μM, and were inactive toward human noncancerous lung and colorectal cells. Compounds 1, 3, 6, 7, and 8 showed moderate to weak cytotoxicity. Docking studies of compounds 2 and 4 showed that they bind with EGFR tyrosine kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 through hydrogen bonding interactions with the important amino acids, including Lys721, Met769, Asn818, Arg157, Ile10, and Glu12.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
  9. Krishnan P, Lee FK, Yap VA, Low YY, Kam TS, Yong KT, et al.
    J Nat Prod, 2020 01 24;83(1):152-158.
    PMID: 31935094 DOI: 10.1021/acs.jnatprod.9b01160
    Schwarzinicines A-G (1-7), representing the first examples of 1,4-diarylbutanoid-phenethylamine conjugates, were isolated from the leaves of Ficus schwarzii. The structures of these compounds were determined by detailed analysis of their MS, 1D and 2D NMR data. Compounds 1-4 exhibited pronounced vasorelaxant effects in the rat isolated aorta (Emax 106-120%; EC50 0.96-2.10 μM). However, compounds 1 and 2 showed no cytotoxic effects against A549, MCF-7, and HCT 116 human cancer cells (IC50 > 10 μM).
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry*
  10. Maher T, Ahmad Raus R, Daddiouaissa D, Ahmad F, Adzhar NS, Latif ES, et al.
    Molecules, 2021 May 07;26(9).
    PMID: 34066963 DOI: 10.3390/molecules26092741
    Leukemia is a leukocyte cancer that is characterized by anarchic growth of immature immune cells in the bone marrow, blood and spleen. There are many forms of leukemia, and the best course of therapy and the chance of a patient's survival depend on the type of leukemic disease. Different forms of drugs have been used to treat leukemia. Due to the adverse effects associated with such therapies and drug resistance, the search for safer and more effective drugs remains one of the most challenging areas of research. Thus, new therapeutic approaches are important to improving outcomes. Almost half of the drugs utilized nowadays in treating cancer are from natural products and their derivatives. Medicinal plants have proven to be an effective natural source of anti-leukemic drugs. The cytotoxicity and the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of these plants to leukemic cells and their isolated compounds were investigated. Effort has been made throughout this comprehensive review to highlight the recent developments and milestones achieved in leukemia therapies using plant-derived compounds and the crude extracts from various medicinal plants. Furthermore, the mechanisms of action of these plants are discussed.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/therapeutic use*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
  11. Zhang M, Yang Q, Zhang X, Wu H
    Nat Prod Res, 2021 Oct;35(20):3426-3431.
    PMID: 31821060 DOI: 10.1080/14786419.2019.1700509
    A new cycloartane triterpene bisdesmoside, soulieoside T (1), and one known compound, oleanolic acid (2), were isolated from the ethanolic extract of the rhizomes of Actaea vaginata. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and by comparison with data reported in the literature. Compound 1 was evaluated for cytotoxic activities against three human cancer cell lines.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
  12. Malek SN, Phang CW, Ibrahim H, Norhanom AW, Sim KS
    Molecules, 2011 Jan 14;16(1):583-9.
    PMID: 21240148 DOI: 10.3390/molecules16010583
    The methanol and fractionated extracts (hexane, ethyl acetate and water) of Alpinia mutica (Zingiberaceae) rhizomes were investigated for their cytotoxic effect against six human carcinoma cell lines, namely KB, MCF7, A549, Caski, HCT116, HT29 and non-human fibroblast cell line (MRC 5) using an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. The ethyl acetate extract possessed high inhibitory effect against KB, MCF7 and Caski cells (IC₅₀ values of 9.4, 19.7 and 19.8 µg/mL, respectively). Flavokawin B (1), 5,6-dehydrokawain (2), pinostrobin chalcone (3) and alpinetin (4), isolated from the active ethyl acetate extract were also evaluated for their cytotoxic activity. Of these, pinostrobin chalcone (3) and alpinetin (4) were isolated from this plant for the first time. Pinostrobin chalcone (3) displayed very remarkable cytotoxic activity against the tested human cancer cells, such as KB, MCF7 and Caski cells (IC₅₀ values of 6.2, 7.3 and 7.7 µg/mL, respectively). This is the first report of the cytotoxic activity of Alpinia mutica.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  13. Chan EW, Wong SK, Chan HT
    J Integr Med, 2016 Jul;14(4):269-84.
    PMID: 27417173 DOI: 10.1016/S2095-4964(16)60261-3
    Apocynaceae is a large family of tropical trees, shrubs and vines with most species producing white latex. Major metabolites of species are triterpenoids, iridoids, alkaloids and cardenolides, which are known for a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities such as cardioprotective, hepatoprotective, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, anticancer and antimalarial properties. Prompted by their anticancer and antimalarial properties, the current knowledge on ten genera (Allamanda, Alstonia, Calotropis, Catharanthus, Cerbera, Dyera, Kopsia, Nerium, Plumeria and Vallaris) is updated. Major classes of metabolites are described using some species as examples. Species with antiproliferative (APF) and/or antiplasmodial (APM) properties have been identified. With the exception of the genus Dyera, nine genera of 22 species possess APF activity. Seven genera (Alstonia, Calotropis, Catharanthus, Dyera, Kopsia, Plumeria and Vallaris) of 13 species have APM properties. Among these species, Alstonia angustiloba, Alstonia macrophylla, Calotropis gigantea, Calotropis procera, Catharanthus roseus, Plumeria alba and Vallaris glabra displayed both APF and APM properties. The chemical constituents of these seven species are compiled for assessment and further research.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  14. Chan EWC, Wong SK, Tangah J, Inoue T, Chan HT
    J Integr Med, 2020 May;18(3):189-195.
    PMID: 32115383 DOI: 10.1016/j.joim.2020.02.006
    Flavonoids are by far the most dominant class of phenolic compounds isolated from Morus alba leaves (MAL). Other classes of compounds are benzofurans, phenolic acids, alkaloids, coumarins, chalcones and stilbenes. Major flavonoids are kuwanons, moracinflavans, moragrols and morkotins. Other major compounds include moracins (benzofurans), caffeoylquinic acids (phenolic acids) and morachalcones (chalcones). Research on the anticancer properties of MAL entailed in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity of extracts or isolated compounds. Flavonoids, benzofurans, chalcones and alkaloids are classes of compounds from MAL that have been found to be cytotoxic towards human cancer cell lines. Further studies on the phytochemistry and anticancer of MAL are suggested. Sources of information were PubMed, PubMed Central, ScienceDirect, Google, Google Scholar, J-Stage, PubChem and China National Knowledge Infrastructure.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  15. Mayakrishnan V, Kannappan P, Shanmugasundaram K, Abdullah N
    Pak J Pharm Sci, 2014 Nov;27(6):1911-7.
    PMID: 25362615
    Cyathula prostrata (Linn) Blume herbs are commonly used for the treatment of inflammatory and pain in Nigeria. The objective of the present study was to assess the antitumor and antioxidant activity of Cyathula prostrata (Linn) Blume in mice model. The treatment of Dalton's lymphoma ascites cells induced tumor by the methanolic extract of Cyathula prostrata was determined at concentration of 100 mg/ kg body weight given orally for 11 days, antitumor activity was assessed by monitoring the mean survival time, body weight, effect on hematological parameters, antioxidant enzyme levels and histopathological evidence. The results showed that the methanolic extract of Cyathula prostrata increased the survival period of animals, decreased the body weight and also altered many hematological markers and also restored the antioxidant enzymes when compared to the mice of the DLA control group. These findings indicate that the methanolic extract of C. prostrata has anti-tumor activity by preventing the lipid peroxidation and thereby promoting the antioxidant systems in Dalton's lymphoma ascites induced mice. So, these extract could be a natural anticancer agent for human health.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/therapeutic use*
  16. Mah SH, Lian Ee GC, Teh SS, Sukari MA
    Pak J Pharm Sci, 2015 Mar;28(2):425-9.
    PMID: 25730799
    Structure-activity relationships of eleven xanthones were comparatively predicted for four cancer cell lines after the compounds were subjected to antiproliferative assay against B-lymphocyte cells (Raji), colon carcinoma cells (LS174T), human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32) and skin carcinoma cells (SK-MEL-28). The eleven chemical constituents were obtained naturally from the stem bark of Calophyllum inophyllum and Calophyllum soulattri. Inophinnin (1) and inophinone (2) were isolated from Calophyllum inophyllum while soulattrin (3) and phylattrin (4) were found from Calophyllum soulattri. The other xanthones were from both Calophyllum sp. and they are pyranojacareubin (5), rheediaxanthone A (6), macluraxanthone (7), 4-hydroxyxanthone (8), caloxanthone C (9), brasixanthone B (10) and trapezifolixanthone (11). Compound 3 was found to be the most cytotoxic towards all the cancer cell lines with an IC50 value of 1.25μg/mL while the simplest xanthone, compound 8 was inactive.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  17. Shahruzaman SH, Yusof FZ, Maniam S, Fakurazi S, Maniam S
    BMC Complement Med Ther, 2021 Oct 01;21(1):245.
    PMID: 34598696 DOI: 10.1186/s12906-021-03417-9
    BACKGROUND: Adaptive metabolic response towards a low oxygen environment is essential to maintain rapid tumour proliferation and progression. The vascular network that surrounds the tumour develops an intermittent hypoxic condition and stimulates hypoxia-inducing factors. Baeckea frutescens is used in traditional medicine and known to possess antibacterial and cytoprotective properties. In this study, the cytotoxic effect of B. frutescens leaves and branches extracts against hypoxic human breast cancer (MCF-7) was investigated.

    METHOD: The extracts were prepared using Soxhlet apparatus for ethanol and hexane extracts while the water extracts were freeze-dried. In vitro cytotoxic activities of B. frutescens extracts of various concentrations (20 to 160 μg/mL) at 24, 48, and 72 hours time points were studied using MTT in chemically induced hypoxic condition and in 3-dimensional in vitro cell culture system. An initial characterisation of B. frutescens extracts was carried out using Fourier-transform Infrared- Attenuated Total Reflection (FTIR-ATR) to determine the presence of functional groups.

    RESULTS: All leaf extracts except for water showed IC50 values ranging from 23 -158 μg/mL. Hexane extract showed the lowest IC50 value (23 μg/mL), indicating its potent cytotoxic activity. Among the branch extracts, only the 70% ethanolic extract (B70) showed an IC50 value. The hexane leaf extract tested on 3- dimensional cultured cells showed an IC50 value of 17.2 μg/mL. The FTIR-ATR spectroscopy analysis identified various characteristic peak values with different functional groups such as alcohol, alkenes, alkynes, carbonyl, aromatic rings, ethers, ester, and carboxylic acids. Interestingly, the FTIR-ATR spectra report a complex and unique profile of the hexane extract, which warrants further investigation.

    CONCLUSION: Adaptation of tumour cells to hypoxia significantly contributes to the aggressiveness and chemoresistance of different tumours. The identification of B. frutescens and its possible role in eliminating breast cancer cells in hypoxic conditions defines a new role of natural product that can be utilised as an effective agent that regulates metabolic reprogramming in breast cancer.

    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  18. Ali AM, Mackeen MM, Hamid M, Aun QB, Zauyah Y, Azimahtol HL, et al.
    Planta Med, 1997 Feb;63(1):81-3.
    PMID: 9063100
    The cytotoxicity of goniothalamin was found to be strong towards both cancerous (HGC-27, MCF-7, PANC-1, HeLa), and non-cancerous (3T3) cell lines, especially in cases of dividing cells. Drug exposure studies indicated that the cytotoxic action of goniothalamin was time- and dose-dependent. At the ultrastructural level, goniothalamin-induced cytotoxicity revealed a necrotic mode of cell death towards MCF-7 cells.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*
  19. Yap WS, Gan CY, Low YY, Choo YM, Etoh T, Hayashi M, et al.
    J Nat Prod, 2011 May 27;74(5):1309-12.
    PMID: 21428274 DOI: 10.1021/np200008g
    Three new indole alkaloids (1-3), named grandilodines A-C, and five known ones were obtained from the Malayan Kopsia grandifolia. The structures were established using NMR and MS analyses and, in the case of 1 and 2, were confirmed by X-ray diffraction analyses. Alkaloids 1, 3, and lapidilectine B (8) were found to reverse multidrug resistance in vincristine-resistant KB cells.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/pharmacology*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry
  20. Malek SN, Lee GS, Hong SL, Yaacob H, Wahab NA, Faizal Weber JF, et al.
    Molecules, 2011 May 31;16(6):4539-48.
    PMID: 21629182 DOI: 10.3390/molecules16064539
    Investigations on the cytotoxic effects of the crude methanol and fractionated extracts (hexane, ethyl acetate) C. mangga against six human cancer cell lines, namely the hormone-dependent breast cell line (MCF-7), nasopharyngeal epidermoid cell line (KB), lung cell line (A549), cervical cell line (Ca Ski), colon cell lines (HCT 116 and HT-29), and one non-cancer human fibroblast cell line (MRC-5) were conducted using an in-vitro neutral red cytotoxicity assay. The crude methanol and fractionated extracts (hexane and ethyl acetate) displayed good cytotoxic effects against MCF-7, KB, A549, Ca Ski and HT-29 cell lines, but exerted no damage on the MRC-5 line. Chemical investigation from the hexane and ethyl acetate fractions resulted in the isolation of seven pure compounds, namely (E)-labda-8(17),12-dien-15,16-dial (1), (E)-15,16-bisnor-labda-8(17),11-dien-13-on (2), zerumin A (3), β-sitosterol, curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bis-demethoxycurcumin. Compounds 1 and 3 exhibited high cytotoxic effects against all six selected cancer cell lines, while compounds 2 showed no anti-proliferative activity on the tested cell lines. Compound 1 also demonstrated strong cytotoxicity against the normal cell line MRC-5. This paper reports for the first time the cytotoxic activities of C. mangga extracts on KB, A549, Ca Ski, HT-29 and MRC-5, and the occurrence of compound 2 and 3 in C. mangga.
    Matched MeSH terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/isolation & purification; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/toxicity*; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/chemistry*
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